Reduced Engine Power write-up

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tomloans

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Hello all. Thought this might help someone who has had this issue over and over again. The best write up I have seen...

Hello all,

For anyone reading this old post regarding the numerous years of Silverado's going into "reduced power mode" I will share my findings, hope this helps someone with this very frustrating problem which I also have dealt with on and off for the past few years and FINALLY fixed.

Just for reference, my truck is a 2003 HD1500 crew cab with the 6.0 Vortec that has just over 200,000 miles on the clock. The last few winters when it would get at or below about 10 F I would get the REP message and check engine light on the dash, could only go about 15 MPH tops when it happens, very inconvenient and dangerous to say the least. You have to stop, shut the engine off, wait a few seconds then restart and it will run fine until it does it again. At first just seemed it was temperature related but as time went on it seemed to do it whenever, @ 30 MPH, @ 60 MPH, in the middle of rush hour traffic (not fun), after it rained, when it was 90 F outside and the A/C was on, just never seemed to make any rhyme or reason and did it when it felt like it. I was also experiencing an off and on "surge" both at slower in town speeds and on the highway when holding the pedal steady @ 65MPH, when it started doing this I new the REP message on the dash was just a minute or so away and sure enough it would happen. The code I got was always the same, P1516 which is the TAC (throttle actuator control module), but if you try look for a new TAC you will find out they are not only difficult to find new, they are very spendy as well. For those that have wasted money replacing the TAC have found in 99% of the cases it has not fixed the problem, so I decided I wasn't going to replace the TAC just yet as my thinking is they either work or they don't and I find it hard to believe it would just work fine one minute and not the next.

I checked all the usual suspects and bulletins including the plug and wires going to the throttle body, cleaned the MAF sensor, cleaned the throttle body, checked the connections to the TAC and on and on to no avail.

First off, DON'T start throwing parts at it, you are wasting your time and money! I put three (yes 3) throttle bodies on my truck since this past February, one after-market unit and 2- AC Delco re-man units, it would run fine anywhere from a couple months to a couple of days and the problem was back again with the same P1516 code as I've read here about a zillion times now with others experiencing the exact same problem.

This is a GROUNDING ISSUE plain and simple and there are a few other things to check along the way I will cover, but I'll start with the grounding problems first. Start out by disconnecting the battery, both sides, while you work on it this will also allow the code(s) to clear.

There are 3 ground connections of concern, the one at the back of the engine (near the firewall) connected to the block on the passenger side just below the cylinder head, the one on the back of the engine connected to the back side of cylinder head on the driver's side of the engine, and the grounds on the frame under the drivers side door which is easy to get at but the others are NOT. Start out by removing and cleaning the ground connection on the frame under the drivers door, if you have to use a grinder or equivalent to get good clean metal on the frame then do so. Pick up a tube of dialectic grease, it will be your new friend, apply it to the grounds and re-connect them. This MIGHT solve the problem but I doubt it will alone but good to do anyways.

Next comes the fun part. The two grounds on the back of the engine are IMPOSSIBLE to get at without removing the intake manifold unless you are some sort of contortionist with very small hands and have x-ray vision and can see through metal. You want to remove the intake to get at them and you want to do this anyways as there is more to this story. The intake gaskets are known to fail causing an intake leak and excessive pinging under acceleration, so while you in the process of getting at the 2 grounds, replace the intake gaskets and you might as well replace the knock sensors (as they may be corroded) and the knock sensor wire harness for good measure while you are in there.

After the intake ducting is removed, the intake is off, etc., etc. The ground on the passenger side of the block is held on by a 13mm bolt, the one on the drivers side is a 15mm (at least it was in my case). This requires you kneel on the upper portion of the radiator support to reach them and is still somewhat of a trick, use some padding to protect your knees. DON'T just assume by grabbing on to these grounds and finding they are tight that they are good! Trust me they are NOT! Take your time, get both out in the open because you are going to want to fix both. Once you have these grounds out in the open you will notice the original metal ring terminals seem tight and well connected, but upon closer inspection you will see they are crimped over the plastic of the wire but very little if any inside wire strand is actually touching the metal ring, THIS IS A CRAP CONNECTION! Proceed to clip the rings off, strip the wire back and put on a new ring terminal, use some dielectric grease on the terminal where you insert the wire, crimp it tightly and I would also recommend using some heat shrink tube slipped on the wire first before you crimp on the new ring, then slide the shrink tube over the connection and warm it up with a hair dryer or equivalent, you can also solder this connection for good measure if you feel like it, but a good crimp with the dielectric grease all covered with shrink tube should do the job, in any case it will be way better than what you had in the first place.

After you have replaced both ground rings it's time for reassembly. Using a piece of sandpaper, first clean the contact area where the grounds connect, wipe them clean and apply more dielectric grease, use it liberally, re-connect the grounds, tighten the bolts and insure they are tight. Now on to the intake, install your new gaskets which clip on to the intake, install your new knock sensors and tighten them to 15 lb. ft. DO NOT over tighten the knock sensors, they are VERY sensitive! To give you an idea of how tight, they are basically hand tight and then just a hair more, if you have a torque wrench, use it. Plug in your new knock sensor wires, re-install the intake with the new gaskets, plug in all the connectors, re-attach the fuel line to the injector rail on the passenger side, reconnect the air ducting and so on, reconnect the battery, you are now ready for your first start up.

Per what I've read, you should perform a throttle body "relearn" after the battery has been disconnected for a length of time. If you look up "throttle body relearn" for your make and model you should find the process for your vehicle. Mine was basically turn the key on, turn the key off 5 seconds, turn the key on for 5 seconds, turn the key off for 15 seconds, turn it on for 15 seconds, turn it off and start the truck. Let it warm up to full operating temperature (185 F+), do not touch the throttle while it is warming up, just let it idle. After it has warmed up, turn on the A/C (if so equipped) in park for 10 seconds, leave the A/C on and put it in drive for 10 seconds, leave it in drive and turn the A/C off for 10 seconds, then put it in park and turn the vehicle off and you're done! Restart and take it out for a drive to see how it runs.

A few things to check if the problem persists and you've done all of the above: Again all this is done with the battery DISCONNECTED. Open up the power box under the hood on the drivers side inner fender, the top that holds all the relays and fuses flips open so you can look underneath it. Check for a mouse nest or debris (quite common) underneath, also check for any wires that may have been chewed on by mice, look carefully moving the plugs and wires around, you may find bare areas on the wires (also a very common problem), clean out the box and repair any wires that are damaged as this could have also been your problem. While you are in there, disconnect and clean all the positive main terminals, relays and so on and apply dielectric grease to their sockets, re-tighten terminals, for good measure unplug the plugs, apply dielectric grease to them as well and re-connect.

Your PCM may have grounding issues: The PCM is located at the front of the drivers side inner fender. Get it out in the open and removed the blue plug, look for the black / white wire in the #1 pin position which is the ground. A few inches from the plug, carefully strip back some of the plastic covering the wire, do not cut the wire! Solder on another wire to this ground, re-cover it well after you have made this connection and run this lead as an additional ground up to the lug on the firewall where the main ground strap from the engine is connected, again clean everything, use dielectric grease and be sure the nut is tight.

A few other possibilities. With both of the large plugs (blue and red) disconnected from the PCM inspect the pins on the PCM itself, if any are burned, corroded or otherwise it may be time for a new PCM.

If you replaced the sensor on the gas pedal (the one inside the vehicle on the gas pedal assembly) it may be out of sync with the TAC module which is on the drivers side firewall under the hood and the pedal assembly is plugged into it. I have read that the original gas pedal sensor is calibrated to work with the original TAC and if you replace either, things will not work or will result in the "reduced power message" and I tend to agree with this. If none of the above has helped and you decide to attempt replacing either it's best off to buy a TAC and a pedal assembly complete together from the same truck at a junk yard. If you have replaced any of these parts, do not throw them away as you may now need them!

I actually just performed all this recently and my truck runs so smooth now in comparison to how it did when I was having the problems it's like night and day, so far no trouble codes and it continues to run perfectly.

I hope all this can help some of you experiencing this very irritating problem.

Good luck!



Marc

This was found here...
 

B-train

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Excellent write up. Thanks for sharing. And I'll also add.......if you love it, lube it. I'm a big fan of dielectric grease on connection points, especially in salt areas. I put that shit on everything. LOL
 

iamdub

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Great info!

Speaking of, this is another instance where the Big 3 (or 4 or 5) upgrade would have helped or resolved the issues including some you might not know exist or exist yet.
 
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OP
T

tomloans

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Great info!

Speaking of, this is another instance where the Big 3 (or 4 or 5) upgrade would have helped or resolved the issues including some you might not know exist or exist yet.
The problem with this issue is lack of focus on the issue. This issue is real and painful even in much of the models above the 2006 era. I just can't believe they haven't paid special attention to the foot pedal/throttle body connection issue. This is really ridiculous. I have spent so many man-hours trying to address this problem on both my 2003's. Just go back to wire for goodness sakes! Easy peasy! (I am frustrated with GM not you iambub)
 
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MassHoe04

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Hello all. Thought this might help someone who has had this issue over and over again. The best write up I have seen...

Hello all,

For anyone reading this old post regarding the numerous years of Silverado's going into "reduced power mode" I will share my findings, hope this helps someone with this very frustrating problem which I also have dealt with on and off for the past few years and FINALLY fixed.

Just for reference, my truck is a 2003 HD1500 crew cab with the 6.0 Vortec that has just over 200,000 miles on the clock. The last few winters when it would get at or below about 10 F I would get the REP message and check engine light on the dash, could only go about 15 MPH tops when it happens, very inconvenient and dangerous to say the least. You have to stop, shut the engine off, wait a few seconds then restart and it will run fine until it does it again. At first just seemed it was temperature related but as time went on it seemed to do it whenever, @ 30 MPH, @ 60 MPH, in the middle of rush hour traffic (not fun), after it rained, when it was 90 F outside and the A/C was on, just never seemed to make any rhyme or reason and did it when it felt like it. I was also experiencing an off and on "surge" both at slower in town speeds and on the highway when holding the pedal steady @ 65MPH, when it started doing this I new the REP message on the dash was just a minute or so away and sure enough it would happen. The code I got was always the same, P1516 which is the TAC (throttle actuator control module), but if you try look for a new TAC you will find out they are not only difficult to find new, they are very spendy as well. For those that have wasted money replacing the TAC have found in 99% of the cases it has not fixed the problem, so I decided I wasn't going to replace the TAC just yet as my thinking is they either work or they don't and I find it hard to believe it would just work fine one minute and not the next.

I checked all the usual suspects and bulletins including the plug and wires going to the throttle body, cleaned the MAF sensor, cleaned the throttle body, checked the connections to the TAC and on and on to no avail.

First off, DON'T start throwing parts at it, you are wasting your time and money! I put three (yes 3) throttle bodies on my truck since this past February, one after-market unit and 2- AC Delco re-man units, it would run fine anywhere from a couple months to a couple of days and the problem was back again with the same P1516 code as I've read here about a zillion times now with others experiencing the exact same problem.

This is a GROUNDING ISSUE plain and simple and there are a few other things to check along the way I will cover, but I'll start with the grounding problems first. Start out by disconnecting the battery, both sides, while you work on it this will also allow the code(s) to clear.

There are 3 ground connections of concern, the one at the back of the engine (near the firewall) connected to the block on the passenger side just below the cylinder head, the one on the back of the engine connected to the back side of cylinder head on the driver's side of the engine, and the grounds on the frame under the drivers side door which is easy to get at but the others are NOT. Start out by removing and cleaning the ground connection on the frame under the drivers door, if you have to use a grinder or equivalent to get good clean metal on the frame then do so. Pick up a tube of dialectic grease, it will be your new friend, apply it to the grounds and re-connect them. This MIGHT solve the problem but I doubt it will alone but good to do anyways.

Next comes the fun part. The two grounds on the back of the engine are IMPOSSIBLE to get at without removing the intake manifold unless you are some sort of contortionist with very small hands and have x-ray vision and can see through metal. You want to remove the intake to get at them and you want to do this anyways as there is more to this story. The intake gaskets are known to fail causing an intake leak and excessive pinging under acceleration, so while you in the process of getting at the 2 grounds, replace the intake gaskets and you might as well replace the knock sensors (as they may be corroded) and the knock sensor wire harness for good measure while you are in there.

After the intake ducting is removed, the intake is off, etc., etc. The ground on the passenger side of the block is held on by a 13mm bolt, the one on the drivers side is a 15mm (at least it was in my case). This requires you kneel on the upper portion of the radiator support to reach them and is still somewhat of a trick, use some padding to protect your knees. DON'T just assume by grabbing on to these grounds and finding they are tight that they are good! Trust me they are NOT! Take your time, get both out in the open because you are going to want to fix both. Once you have these grounds out in the open you will notice the original metal ring terminals seem tight and well connected, but upon closer inspection you will see they are crimped over the plastic of the wire but very little if any inside wire strand is actually touching the metal ring, THIS IS A CRAP CONNECTION! Proceed to clip the rings off, strip the wire back and put on a new ring terminal, use some dielectric grease on the terminal where you insert the wire, crimp it tightly and I would also recommend using some heat shrink tube slipped on the wire first before you crimp on the new ring, then slide the shrink tube over the connection and warm it up with a hair dryer or equivalent, you can also solder this connection for good measure if you feel like it, but a good crimp with the dielectric grease all covered with shrink tube should do the job, in any case it will be way better than what you had in the first place.

After you have replaced both ground rings it's time for reassembly. Using a piece of sandpaper, first clean the contact area where the grounds connect, wipe them clean and apply more dielectric grease, use it liberally, re-connect the grounds, tighten the bolts and insure they are tight. Now on to the intake, install your new gaskets which clip on to the intake, install your new knock sensors and tighten them to 15 lb. ft. DO NOT over tighten the knock sensors, they are VERY sensitive! To give you an idea of how tight, they are basically hand tight and then just a hair more, if you have a torque wrench, use it. Plug in your new knock sensor wires, re-install the intake with the new gaskets, plug in all the connectors, re-attach the fuel line to the injector rail on the passenger side, reconnect the air ducting and so on, reconnect the battery, you are now ready for your first start up.

Per what I've read, you should perform a throttle body "relearn" after the battery has been disconnected for a length of time. If you look up "throttle body relearn" for your make and model you should find the process for your vehicle. Mine was basically turn the key on, turn the key off 5 seconds, turn the key on for 5 seconds, turn the key off for 15 seconds, turn it on for 15 seconds, turn it off and start the truck. Let it warm up to full operating temperature (185 F+), do not touch the throttle while it is warming up, just let it idle. After it has warmed up, turn on the A/C (if so equipped) in park for 10 seconds, leave the A/C on and put it in drive for 10 seconds, leave it in drive and turn the A/C off for 10 seconds, then put it in park and turn the vehicle off and you're done! Restart and take it out for a drive to see how it runs.

A few things to check if the problem persists and you've done all of the above: Again all this is done with the battery DISCONNECTED. Open up the power box under the hood on the drivers side inner fender, the top that holds all the relays and fuses flips open so you can look underneath it. Check for a mouse nest or debris (quite common) underneath, also check for any wires that may have been chewed on by mice, look carefully moving the plugs and wires around, you may find bare areas on the wires (also a very common problem), clean out the box and repair any wires that are damaged as this could have also been your problem. While you are in there, disconnect and clean all the positive main terminals, relays and so on and apply dielectric grease to their sockets, re-tighten terminals, for good measure unplug the plugs, apply dielectric grease to them as well and re-connect.

Your PCM may have grounding issues: The PCM is located at the front of the drivers side inner fender. Get it out in the open and removed the blue plug, look for the black / white wire in the #1 pin position which is the ground. A few inches from the plug, carefully strip back some of the plastic covering the wire, do not cut the wire! Solder on another wire to this ground, re-cover it well after you have made this connection and run this lead as an additional ground up to the lug on the firewall where the main ground strap from the engine is connected, again clean everything, use dielectric grease and be sure the nut is tight.

A few other possibilities. With both of the large plugs (blue and red) disconnected from the PCM inspect the pins on the PCM itself, if any are burned, corroded or otherwise it may be time for a new PCM.

If you replaced the sensor on the gas pedal (the one inside the vehicle on the gas pedal assembly) it may be out of sync with the TAC module which is on the drivers side firewall under the hood and the pedal assembly is plugged into it. I have read that the original gas pedal sensor is calibrated to work with the original TAC and if you replace either, things will not work or will result in the "reduced power message" and I tend to agree with this. If none of the above has helped and you decide to attempt replacing either it's best off to buy a TAC and a pedal assembly complete together from the same truck at a junk yard. If you have replaced any of these parts, do not throw them away as you may now need them!

I actually just performed all this recently and my truck runs so smooth now in comparison to how it did when I was having the problems it's like night and day, so far no trouble codes and it continues to run perfectly.

I hope all this can help some of you experiencing this very irritating problem.

Good luck!



Marc

This was found here...
You are the best for doing this detailed write-up!
I am sure it will help many members in the future.

Thanks!
 

JonnyTahoe

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I have a 2000 steel cable foot pedal Throttle Body Yukon. Very reliable except for a idle air control module. Thanks for taking the time. Great Information.
 
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Donal

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Hello all. Thought this might help someone who has had this issue over and over again. The best write up I have seen...

Hello all,

For anyone reading this old post regarding the numerous years of Silverado's going into "reduced power mode" I will share my findings, hope this helps someone with this very frustrating problem which I also have dealt with on and off for the past few years and FINALLY fixed.

Just for reference, my truck is a 2003 HD1500 crew cab with the 6.0 Vortec that has just over 200,000 miles on the clock. The last few winters when it would get at or below about 10 F I would get the REP message and check engine light on the dash, could only go about 15 MPH tops when it happens, very inconvenient and dangerous to say the least. You have to stop, shut the engine off, wait a few seconds then restart and it will run fine until it does it again. At first just seemed it was temperature related but as time went on it seemed to do it whenever, @ 30 MPH, @ 60 MPH, in the middle of rush hour traffic (not fun), after it rained, when it was 90 F outside and the A/C was on, just never seemed to make any rhyme or reason and did it when it felt like it. I was also experiencing an off and on "surge" both at slower in town speeds and on the highway when holding the pedal steady @ 65MPH, when it started doing this I new the REP message on the dash was just a minute or so away and sure enough it would happen. The code I got was always the same, P1516 which is the TAC (throttle actuator control module), but if you try look for a new TAC you will find out they are not only difficult to find new, they are very spendy as well. For those that have wasted money replacing the TAC have found in 99% of the cases it has not fixed the problem, so I decided I wasn't going to replace the TAC just yet as my thinking is they either work or they don't and I find it hard to believe it would just work fine one minute and not the next.

I checked all the usual suspects and bulletins including the plug and wires going to the throttle body, cleaned the MAF sensor, cleaned the throttle body, checked the connections to the TAC and on and on to no avail.

First off, DON'T start throwing parts at it, you are wasting your time and money! I put three (yes 3) throttle bodies on my truck since this past February, one after-market unit and 2- AC Delco re-man units, it would run fine anywhere from a couple months to a couple of days and the problem was back again with the same P1516 code as I've read here about a zillion times now with others experiencing the exact same problem.

This is a GROUNDING ISSUE plain and simple and there are a few other things to check along the way I will cover, but I'll start with the grounding problems first. Start out by disconnecting the battery, both sides, while you work on it this will also allow the code(s) to clear.

There are 3 ground connections of concern, the one at the back of the engine (near the firewall) connected to the block on the passenger side just below the cylinder head, the one on the back of the engine connected to the back side of cylinder head on the driver's side of the engine, and the grounds on the frame under the drivers side door which is easy to get at but the others are NOT. Start out by removing and cleaning the ground connection on the frame under the drivers door, if you have to use a grinder or equivalent to get good clean metal on the frame then do so. Pick up a tube of dialectic grease, it will be your new friend, apply it to the grounds and re-connect them. This MIGHT solve the problem but I doubt it will alone but good to do anyways.

Next comes the fun part. The two grounds on the back of the engine are IMPOSSIBLE to get at without removing the intake manifold unless you are some sort of contortionist with very small hands and have x-ray vision and can see through metal. You want to remove the intake to get at them and you want to do this anyways as there is more to this story. The intake gaskets are known to fail causing an intake leak and excessive pinging under acceleration, so while you in the process of getting at the 2 grounds, replace the intake gaskets and you might as well replace the knock sensors (as they may be corroded) and the knock sensor wire harness for good measure while you are in there.

After the intake ducting is removed, the intake is off, etc., etc. The ground on the passenger side of the block is held on by a 13mm bolt, the one on the drivers side is a 15mm (at least it was in my case). This requires you kneel on the upper portion of the radiator support to reach them and is still somewhat of a trick, use some padding to protect your knees. DON'T just assume by grabbing on to these grounds and finding they are tight that they are good! Trust me they are NOT! Take your time, get both out in the open because you are going to want to fix both. Once you have these grounds out in the open you will notice the original metal ring terminals seem tight and well connected, but upon closer inspection you will see they are crimped over the plastic of the wire but very little if any inside wire strand is actually touching the metal ring, THIS IS A CRAP CONNECTION! Proceed to clip the rings off, strip the wire back and put on a new ring terminal, use some dielectric grease on the terminal where you insert the wire, crimp it tightly and I would also recommend using some heat shrink tube slipped on the wire first before you crimp on the new ring, then slide the shrink tube over the connection and warm it up with a hair dryer or equivalent, you can also solder this connection for good measure if you feel like it, but a good crimp with the dielectric grease all covered with shrink tube should do the job, in any case it will be way better than what you had in the first place.

After you have replaced both ground rings it's time for reassembly. Using a piece of sandpaper, first clean the contact area where the grounds connect, wipe them clean and apply more dielectric grease, use it liberally, re-connect the grounds, tighten the bolts and insure they are tight. Now on to the intake, install your new gaskets which clip on to the intake, install your new knock sensors and tighten them to 15 lb. ft. DO NOT over tighten the knock sensors, they are VERY sensitive! To give you an idea of how tight, they are basically hand tight and then just a hair more, if you have a torque wrench, use it. Plug in your new knock sensor wires, re-install the intake with the new gaskets, plug in all the connectors, re-attach the fuel line to the injector rail on the passenger side, reconnect the air ducting and so on, reconnect the battery, you are now ready for your first start up.

Per what I've read, you should perform a throttle body "relearn" after the battery has been disconnected for a length of time. If you look up "throttle body relearn" for your make and model you should find the process for your vehicle. Mine was basically turn the key on, turn the key off 5 seconds, turn the key on for 5 seconds, turn the key off for 15 seconds, turn it on for 15 seconds, turn it off and start the truck. Let it warm up to full operating temperature (185 F+), do not touch the throttle while it is warming up, just let it idle. After it has warmed up, turn on the A/C (if so equipped) in park for 10 seconds, leave the A/C on and put it in drive for 10 seconds, leave it in drive and turn the A/C off for 10 seconds, then put it in park and turn the vehicle off and you're done! Restart and take it out for a drive to see how it runs.

A few things to check if the problem persists and you've done all of the above: Again all this is done with the battery DISCONNECTED. Open up the power box under the hood on the drivers side inner fender, the top that holds all the relays and fuses flips open so you can look underneath it. Check for a mouse nest or debris (quite common) underneath, also check for any wires that may have been chewed on by mice, look carefully moving the plugs and wires around, you may find bare areas on the wires (also a very common problem), clean out the box and repair any wires that are damaged as this could have also been your problem. While you are in there, disconnect and clean all the positive main terminals, relays and so on and apply dielectric grease to their sockets, re-tighten terminals, for good measure unplug the plugs, apply dielectric grease to them as well and re-connect.

Your PCM may have grounding issues: The PCM is located at the front of the drivers side inner fender. Get it out in the open and removed the blue plug, look for the black / white wire in the #1 pin position which is the ground. A few inches from the plug, carefully strip back some of the plastic covering the wire, do not cut the wire! Solder on another wire to this ground, re-cover it well after you have made this connection and run this lead as an additional ground up to the lug on the firewall where the main ground strap from the engine is connected, again clean everything, use dielectric grease and be sure the nut is tight.

A few other possibilities. With both of the large plugs (blue and red) disconnected from the PCM inspect the pins on the PCM itself, if any are burned, corroded or otherwise it may be time for a new PCM.

If you replaced the sensor on the gas pedal (the one inside the vehicle on the gas pedal assembly) it may be out of sync with the TAC module which is on the drivers side firewall under the hood and the pedal assembly is plugged into it. I have read that the original gas pedal sensor is calibrated to work with the original TAC and if you replace either, things will not work or will result in the "reduced power message" and I tend to agree with this. If none of the above has helped and you decide to attempt replacing either it's best off to buy a TAC and a pedal assembly complete together from the same truck at a junk yard. If you have replaced any of these parts, do not throw them away as you may now need them!

I actually just performed all this recently and my truck runs so smooth now in comparison to how it did when I was having the problems it's like night and day, so far no trouble codes and it continues to run perfectly.

I hope all this can help some of you experiencing this very irritating problem.

Good luck!



Marc

This was found here...
The grounding and lack of grounding issue was much worst 60 years ago when most roads were dirt and muddy. I once encountered a 1970 Nova. The complaint was that the voltage regulator was constantly clicking and light flickered. Alternators were fairly new contraptions and had voltage regulators mounted on radiator support. The regulators three coils that opend and closed points to control voltage output. I had adjusted the points gap as specified, no cigar, still had to roll my own. I placed my hand one the regulator to support my body and touched the alternator to check mounting. As soon as I touched the alternator, the clicking stopped. I attached a new ground wire from Negative battery to mount of the regulator and no more problem.
 

Mudsport96

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As a industrial maintenance/electrical worker i can tell you that automotive wiring is done so cheaply it is frightening. And i was a GM tech when this platform was new (August 04- may 06), and at the time we had big problems was ith the H2s and H3s. Yeah, they say HUMMER but they are glorified suburbans and Colorado's.. and water hurts them. Had grounding issues with Suburbans, not to mention at least once a week we were doing fuel sending units because the gauge wouldn't read. And these were year old units.
Now as a "heavy" mechanic/tech i do not understand why there isn't a main ground bar on the fender or firewall that is directly hooked to the negative post. And all the grounds run to it... because let's face it, grounding the body to frame to battery is just asking for something anything to go wrong.
 
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tomloans

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As a industrial maintenance/electrical worker i can tell you that automotive wiring is done so cheaply it is frightening. And i was a GM tech when this platform was new (August 04- may 06), and at the time we had big problems was ith the H2s and H3s. Yeah, they say HUMMER but they are glorified suburbans and Colorado's.. and water hurts them. Had grounding issues with Suburbans, not to mention at least once a week we were doing fuel sending units because the gauge wouldn't read. And these were year old units.
Now as a "heavy" mechanic/tech i do not understand why there isn't a main ground bar on the fender or firewall that is directly hooked to the negative post. And all the grounds run to it... because let's face it, grounding the body to frame to battery is just asking for something anything to go wrong.
I agree with you as this has been such a huge issue which I finally figured the problem. The wires leading to the TPS are ridiculously small and vulnerable. Considering how little voltage that runs through these wires and how important they are to the Chevy ECU, you would have thought after the 2003 to 2006 fiasco, they would have done something better. Anything! So here is what the bottom-line is and I am a little embarrassed to say that I didn't follow instructions exactly.... Follow instructions exactly unless you want to pull over every few miles... you must solder the connections and keep them clear of heat!

 

NotJLB

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Hello all. Thought this might help someone who has had this issue over and over again. The best write up I have seen...

Hello all,

For anyone reading this old post regarding the numerous years of Silverado's going into "reduced power mode" I will share my findings, hope this helps someone with this very frustrating problem which I also have dealt with on and off for the past few years and FINALLY fixed.

Just for reference, my truck is a 2003 HD1500 crew cab with the 6.0 Vortec that has just over 200,000 miles on the clock. The last few winters when it would get at or below about 10 F I would get the REP message and check engine light on the dash, could only go about 15 MPH tops when it happens, very inconvenient and dangerous to say the least. You have to stop, shut the engine off, wait a few seconds then restart and it will run fine until it does it again. At first just seemed it was temperature related but as time went on it seemed to do it whenever, @ 30 MPH, @ 60 MPH, in the middle of rush hour traffic (not fun), after it rained, when it was 90 F outside and the A/C was on, just never seemed to make any rhyme or reason and did it when it felt like it. I was also experiencing an off and on "surge" both at slower in town speeds and on the highway when holding the pedal steady @ 65MPH, when it started doing this I new the REP message on the dash was just a minute or so away and sure enough it would happen. The code I got was always the same, P1516 which is the TAC (throttle actuator control module), but if you try look for a new TAC you will find out they are not only difficult to find new, they are very spendy as well. For those that have wasted money replacing the TAC have found in 99% of the cases it has not fixed the problem, so I decided I wasn't going to replace the TAC just yet as my thinking is they either work or they don't and I find it hard to believe it would just work fine one minute and not the next.

I checked all the usual suspects and bulletins including the plug and wires going to the throttle body, cleaned the MAF sensor, cleaned the throttle body, checked the connections to the TAC and on and on to no avail.

First off, DON'T start throwing parts at it, you are wasting your time and money! I put three (yes 3) throttle bodies on my truck since this past February, one after-market unit and 2- AC Delco re-man units, it would run fine anywhere from a couple months to a couple of days and the problem was back again with the same P1516 code as I've read here about a zillion times now with others experiencing the exact same problem.

This is a GROUNDING ISSUE plain and simple and there are a few other things to check along the way I will cover, but I'll start with the grounding problems first. Start out by disconnecting the battery, both sides, while you work on it this will also allow the code(s) to clear.

There are 3 ground connections of concern, the one at the back of the engine (near the firewall) connected to the block on the passenger side just below the cylinder head, the one on the back of the engine connected to the back side of cylinder head on the driver's side of the engine, and the grounds on the frame under the drivers side door which is easy to get at but the others are NOT. Start out by removing and cleaning the ground connection on the frame under the drivers door, if you have to use a grinder or equivalent to get good clean metal on the frame then do so. Pick up a tube of dialectic grease, it will be your new friend, apply it to the grounds and re-connect them. This MIGHT solve the problem but I doubt it will alone but good to do anyways.

Next comes the fun part. The two grounds on the back of the engine are IMPOSSIBLE to get at without removing the intake manifold unless you are some sort of contortionist with very small hands and have x-ray vision and can see through metal. You want to remove the intake to get at them and you want to do this anyways as there is more to this story. The intake gaskets are known to fail causing an intake leak and excessive pinging under acceleration, so while you in the process of getting at the 2 grounds, replace the intake gaskets and you might as well replace the knock sensors (as they may be corroded) and the knock sensor wire harness for good measure while you are in there.

After the intake ducting is removed, the intake is off, etc., etc. The ground on the passenger side of the block is held on by a 13mm bolt, the one on the drivers side is a 15mm (at least it was in my case). This requires you kneel on the upper portion of the radiator support to reach them and is still somewhat of a trick, use some padding to protect your knees. DON'T just assume by grabbing on to these grounds and finding they are tight that they are good! Trust me they are NOT! Take your time, get both out in the open because you are going to want to fix both. Once you have these grounds out in the open you will notice the original metal ring terminals seem tight and well connected, but upon closer inspection you will see they are crimped over the plastic of the wire but very little if any inside wire strand is actually touching the metal ring, THIS IS A CRAP CONNECTION! Proceed to clip the rings off, strip the wire back and put on a new ring terminal, use some dielectric grease on the terminal where you insert the wire, crimp it tightly and I would also recommend using some heat shrink tube slipped on the wire first before you crimp on the new ring, then slide the shrink tube over the connection and warm it up with a hair dryer or equivalent, you can also solder this connection for good measure if you feel like it, but a good crimp with the dielectric grease all covered with shrink tube should do the job, in any case it will be way better than what you had in the first place.

After you have replaced both ground rings it's time for reassembly. Using a piece of sandpaper, first clean the contact area where the grounds connect, wipe them clean and apply more dielectric grease, use it liberally, re-connect the grounds, tighten the bolts and insure they are tight. Now on to the intake, install your new gaskets which clip on to the intake, install your new knock sensors and tighten them to 15 lb. ft. DO NOT over tighten the knock sensors, they are VERY sensitive! To give you an idea of how tight, they are basically hand tight and then just a hair more, if you have a torque wrench, use it. Plug in your new knock sensor wires, re-install the intake with the new gaskets, plug in all the connectors, re-attach the fuel line to the injector rail on the passenger side, reconnect the air ducting and so on, reconnect the battery, you are now ready for your first start up.

Per what I've read, you should perform a throttle body "relearn" after the battery has been disconnected for a length of time. If you look up "throttle body relearn" for your make and model you should find the process for your vehicle. Mine was basically turn the key on, turn the key off 5 seconds, turn the key on for 5 seconds, turn the key off for 15 seconds, turn it on for 15 seconds, turn it off and start the truck. Let it warm up to full operating temperature (185 F+), do not touch the throttle while it is warming up, just let it idle. After it has warmed up, turn on the A/C (if so equipped) in park for 10 seconds, leave the A/C on and put it in drive for 10 seconds, leave it in drive and turn the A/C off for 10 seconds, then put it in park and turn the vehicle off and you're done! Restart and take it out for a drive to see how it runs.

A few things to check if the problem persists and you've done all of the above: Again all this is done with the battery DISCONNECTED. Open up the power box under the hood on the drivers side inner fender, the top that holds all the relays and fuses flips open so you can look underneath it. Check for a mouse nest or debris (quite common) underneath, also check for any wires that may have been chewed on by mice, look carefully moving the plugs and wires around, you may find bare areas on the wires (also a very common problem), clean out the box and repair any wires that are damaged as this could have also been your problem. While you are in there, disconnect and clean all the positive main terminals, relays and so on and apply dielectric grease to their sockets, re-tighten terminals, for good measure unplug the plugs, apply dielectric grease to them as well and re-connect.

Your PCM may have grounding issues: The PCM is located at the front of the drivers side inner fender. Get it out in the open and removed the blue plug, look for the black / white wire in the #1 pin position which is the ground. A few inches from the plug, carefully strip back some of the plastic covering the wire, do not cut the wire! Solder on another wire to this ground, re-cover it well after you have made this connection and run this lead as an additional ground up to the lug on the firewall where the main ground strap from the engine is connected, again clean everything, use dielectric grease and be sure the nut is tight.

A few other possibilities. With both of the large plugs (blue and red) disconnected from the PCM inspect the pins on the PCM itself, if any are burned, corroded or otherwise it may be time for a new PCM.

If you replaced the sensor on the gas pedal (the one inside the vehicle on the gas pedal assembly) it may be out of sync with the TAC module which is on the drivers side firewall under the hood and the pedal assembly is plugged into it. I have read that the original gas pedal sensor is calibrated to work with the original TAC and if you replace either, things will not work or will result in the "reduced power message" and I tend to agree with this. If none of the above has helped and you decide to attempt replacing either it's best off to buy a TAC and a pedal assembly complete together from the same truck at a junk yard. If you have replaced any of these parts, do not throw them away as you may now need them!

I actually just performed all this recently and my truck runs so smooth now in comparison to how it did when I was having the problems it's like night and day, so far no trouble codes and it continues to run perfectly.

I hope all this can help some of you experiencing this very irritating problem.

Good luck!



Marc

This was found here...
Makes me proud to be a GM guy!!!
 

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