Brakes squeal when coming to a stop

Discussion in 'Engine & Drivetrain' started by Richard Blakely, Nov 6, 2019.

  1. Richard Blakely

    Richard Blakely TYF Newbie

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    Just had brake job done 2 months ago with new front rotors. Everything was fine for first 2 months, but now when coming to a stop, a high-pitched squeal is emitted. Brakes and rotors checked yesterday by firestone, but nothing wrong was found. Plenty of break pad and no rotor scoring. Where else should I look?
     
  2. Doubeleive

    Doubeleive Full Access Member

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    look again closer and see if there is a bent pad sensor or clip hitting/touching the rotor, also check the rear brakes for the same thing as well.
     
  3. PNW VietVet

    PNW VietVet Full Access Member

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    Looks is one thing. When you did the brake job were the rears done at the same time? If the rear is not working properly that can contribute to over worked front brakes that can cause the pads to glaze but will not see that unless you remove the pads to inspect. Any panic stops recently? Salt on the ground where you are? Hopefully whoever did the brake work took the time to clean caliper guides and lube.
     
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  4. petethepug

    petethepug Full Access Member

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    You’ll almost need someone to ride w/ you and stick their head out the window to verify if it’s the front or back. My 08 Denali had both wear out at the same time.

    I was bummed after the front were done and they still squealed. IF ... the front are squeaking check out a you tube video on the procedure. Verify flamerock added the lube on the ears of the caliper pads and they installed new anti squeal clips.

    Pads that are sold as having “anti squeal” backing do not guarantee the won’t squeak. Verify where the noise is and proceed from there.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  5. iamdub

    iamdub Hold on... Lemme overthink this for a bit...

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    Could be the pads. Metallic pads, particularly the cheaper ones, are known for squealing. A buildup of brake dust can cause squealing. Hit up a car wash and spray off the brakes with the pressure washer. Don't do this after riding the brakes or lots of city driving that gets the brakes hot. Let them cool. Or spray them with the water hose before you leave in the morning.
     
  6. kbuskill

    kbuskill ***CAUTION*** I do my own stunts!

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    Apply some brake grease on the back sides of the pads... not on the side that touches the rotor but the side that touches the caliper.
     
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  7. Rocket Man

    Rocket Man Build It Better

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    If you didn’t bed the pads in they might have glazed over. You’ll have to pull the pads to inspect for that so if you’re going to pull them to do anything else be sure to look for that.
     
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  8. Richard Blakely

    Richard Blakely TYF Newbie

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  9. Richard Blakely

    Richard Blakely TYF Newbie

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    Front and rear pads were done. Front rotors had some major scoring so replaced these at same time. Rear rotors were both smooth and within specs, so didn’t replace these. Calipers looked good, although one caliper pin was a little rough and was stuck. It seems like the squeal starts after being on the road for a few minutes, probably time for rotors et al to get hot. Had a vehicle next to me at traffic light give me a dirty look when I stopped. :)
     
  10. PNW VietVet

    PNW VietVet Full Access Member

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    Dirty look?! Tell 'em to "pack it clown" or "Lighten up Francis". If, like Rocket Man said, they did not roadtest properly after the initial brake work and "seat" the pads to the rotors, that can contribute to noise problems. The pads themselves and the rotors themselves all come in different qualities as well. The least expensive attempt to try and fix this is the teardown and very close inspection, put a non directional swirl buffing on the surface of the rotor and clean liberally with brake clean to remove ANY embedded very small metal flakes, do the same to the pad surfaces and of course clean them with brake clean and use a disc brake quiet on the back of the pad and make sure the pad hardware is either new or in great shape and pins/guides are lubed and then go out and roadtest and follow this procedure:


    Break-In Procedure:

    5 moderate to aggressive stops from 40 mph down to 10 mph in rapid succession without letting the brakes cool and do not come to a complete stop. If you’re forced to stop, either shift into neutral or give room in front so you can allow the vehicle to roll slightly while waiting for the light. The rotors will be very hot and holding down the brake pedal will allow the pad to create an imprint on the rotor. This is where the judder can originate from.

    Then do 5 moderate stops from 35 mph to 5 mph in rapid succession without letting the brakes cool. You should expect to smell some resin as the brakes get hot.

    After this is complete, drive around for as long as possible without excessively heating the brakes and without coming to a complete stop (Try for about 5 minutes at moderate speed). This is the cooling stage. It allows the heated resin in the brake pads to cool and cure.

    After the brakes have cooled to standard operating temperature, you may use the brakes normally.


    I went ahead and copied and pasted this so that I didn't mess anything up if I had just typed it free hand. Good luck.
     

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