YUKON 2022. Driving on AUTO Mode

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ckikano

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good morning, I have been driving the GMC Yukon SLT 2022 model for about 23,000KM on AUTO Mode. Will this have any impact on any system or equipment in the car?
AUTO (Automatic Four-Wheel Drive)Use when road surface conditions are variable. When driving in AUTO, the front axle is engaged, and the vehicle's power is sent to the front and rear wheels automatically based on driving conditions. This setting provides slightly lower fuel economy than 2 Mode.
 

PG01

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good morning, I have been driving the GMC Yukon SLT 2022 model for about 23,000KM on AUTO Mode. Will this have any impact on any system or equipment in the car?
AUTO (Automatic Four-Wheel Drive)Use when road surface conditions are variable. When driving in AUTO, the front axle is engaged, and the vehicle's power is sent to the front and rear wheels automatically based on driving conditions. This setting provides slightly lower fuel economy than 2 Mode.
Like I’ve always said, there is no reason to drive these suvs/trucks in auto mode unless road/off road conditions call for it.

Yes I believe you are putting unnecessary wear on the front axle/diff if you drive in auto constantly. The selector is there for a reason, use it when conditions warrant. If you want an AWD vehicle go buy one, this is RWD platform with an option for 4wd. There were models that had AWD on previous generations of the vehicles but since the 2015 model year they have all had a SELECTABLE 4wd transfer case.

MY THOUGHTS/OPINIONS on the auto mode is just what the owners manual says and the way I read it if you don’t need auto 4wd keep it in 2wd. Basically, ‘Auto 4wd’ is just like the trucks from an era long ago… when you had to stop, get out, flip the switch on the front hubs from free to 4wd and then pull a lever in the truck to engage the transfer case. Yes I do believe you are putting unnecessary wear on the front axle. When you are in 2wd (free on the older trucks) nothing is engaged on the front axle back to the transfer case. AUTO locks the hubs (like switching hubs to 4wd on the older trucks) and engaging the front axle. At this point the difference between an old truck and a new one is the fact that a computer is monitoring wheel slip/speed…so if one wheel slips the computer acknowledges this and puts the transfer case into action sending power to all 4 (not really but everyone believes that so we’ll just go with it) and in an old truck you are that computer… if a wheel slips you pull the lever into 4wd sending power to front diff from the transfer case.

This is my opinion on AUTO.
 

Stbentoak

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Mine has 26K miles on it and probably 200 of those were in any conditions that needed anything near 4WD/Auto mode. Mainly hydroplaning fears due to crappy tires!
Leave it in 2wd unless conditions really dictate something else.....Better for your drivetrain.
 

DuraYuk

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I used to rebuild transfer cases and front diffs all the time from people driving in auto in dry paved conditions. System isn't designed like an all wheel drive. You are wearing components if the wheels can't slip (dry/paved conditions), especially turning.
 

tjs3922

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Interesting info. I have mine in 2wd the vast majority of the year. In north central WI it gets used in winter a fair amount but even then not a lot. Good to know about not using it unnecessarily.
 

Doubeleive

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maybe, maybe not
my take on it is the wear is not as ******* the rear diff if the power is split
I have around 54,000 on my 18 and it has been all on "auto" with no ill effects
it's certainly not going to just break out of the blue simply because it's on auto
it does not state anywhere in any manual or book that you cannot or should not drive in "auto"
it only states exactly what you noted above, slightly less mpg.
 

DuraYuk

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maybe, maybe not
my take on it is the wear is not as ******* the rear diff if the power is split
I have around 54,000 on my 18 and it has been all on "auto" with no ill effects
it's certainly not going to just break out of the blue simply because it's on auto
it does not state anywhere in any manual or book that you cannot or should not drive in "auto"
it only states exactly what you noted above, slightly less mpg.
Can you put your vehicle in 4 hi and turn on dry pavement ? Does it bind up? That's what happens in auto on dry pavement when the system engages especially in a turn. It's not designed for it and it will prematurely wear things out. Now if you use AUTO the way it's intended....random conditions that cause slip it will be fine. But on a normal dry day with no slip conditions present where the wheels actually lose traction you can prematurely damage components. If the system worked perfectly you wouldnt have to worry but even in auto it sometimes engages 4wd when nothing is actually slipping.

It was a good warranty pay so if you must do it do it while you have warranty.
 
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PG01

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maybe, maybe not
my take on it is the wear is not as ******* the rear diff if the power is split
I have around 54,000 on my 18 and it has been all on "auto" with no ill effects
it's certainly not going to just break out of the blue simply because it's on auto
it does not state anywhere in any manual or book that you cannot or should not drive in "auto"
it only states exactly what you noted above, slightly less mpg.
That’s one thing we will disagree on Wes. I just feel like it shouldn’t be done.
 
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ckikano

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I used to rebuild transfer cases and front diffs all the time from people driving in auto in dry paved conditions. System isn't designed like an all wheel drive. You are wearing components if the wheels can't slip (dry/paved conditions), especially turning.
How to know if the components might have been damaged? As lately I m feeling vibration in the car , though I have changed the whole set of tires? Also now, when the car on Auto mode and I turn the steering wheel on low speed, I feel like the tires are slipping
 

Doubeleive

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If I don't have it on I will wear the tires out from burn outs, lol and that is with 100% seriousness I have my foot in the pedal way too much to have it in 2wd, even driving the wife's 2wd we just got her im chirping the tires just just driving like I always do. If I wear out the front diff prematurely that's no big deal I can get them for $650 all day long. I will add that I have never felt any binding in auto doesn't mean it's not happening but I haven't ever felt it and I have pretty good feelers. I think the traction control does a pretty good job of detecting wheel slip and works as intended the front differential is a open diff it is not a locker even if 4wd is engaged
 

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