Double-flare Hell

Discussion in 'Engine & Drivetrain' started by Randy Whistler, Mar 13, 2018.

  1. Randy Whistler

    Randy Whistler Only visiting this planet Supporting Member

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    OK, I'm new to the Chevy Tahoe world, but not to the mechanical world, and not without some skill. I've read everything I can find, on this forum, YouTube, the Internet, wherever I could find it, about how to do a double-flare on a brake line.

    No matter what tool I use(I have 2 different ones), and no matter what size line I work on(I've done both 1/4" & 3/16"), I cannot get the bubble thing to come up when using the appropriate die to start my flares with. It seems to press down into the well on the tools, though not very distorted into the shape that I think it's supposed to, nowhere near the bubble-looking result shown in many videos. I've followed(almost anally) the directions - cut it straight, clean up the burrs, get it straight in the tubing clamp, sticks out just to the shoulder of the die - pretty much everything, and more than once! No matter what I do, how I set it, how much or little sticks up, to lube or not lube - or even which tool I use - no bubble like it shows on all the nice videos. . . :mad:

    You want a single flare? I'm your boy! You want a double flare? Sorry, can't do.

    Since I've seen so many videos, both here and elsewhere, that seems to imply that most anyone can do a double flare, I'm feeling a little inferior . . . anyone else having problems with the double flare world? I can't believe that, with 2 different tools, it's the tool's fault, though that's certainly a possibility. I'm beginning to believe that the problem with this procedure is the tool operating the flaring tool. . . .

    Any advice or suggestions before I bite the bullet and have it towed to the mechanic? :emotions122:
     
  2. Galante

    Galante Elite Member Supporting Member

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    Do the double part slow, do a little, wait a min, a little more, wait... etc. is it splitting on you?
     
  3. Randy Whistler

    Randy Whistler Only visiting this planet Supporting Member

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    No, none of my efforts have ever split or failed, with the exception of the ones that were screwed in the first place - cuts weren't straight, wasn't in the tube clamp right, etc. Otherwise they've all come out quite nicely flared - just not doubled.
     
  4. Randy Whistler

    Randy Whistler Only visiting this planet Supporting Member

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    Ok, after watching yet more videos, and comparing what I see with what happens to me, I'm almost convinced that the main problem I have is my double-flare die set. Every video I watch creates a bubble end, to press down with the cone. The die set I have does not. While it does distort the end of the tube somewhat, it never curls the end of the tube over to begin the donut for the flare. Looks like it's time to spend more money and get more of the dies. Hopefully I can find set of dies somewhere without having to purchase another entire kit. . .
     
    corvette744 likes this.
  5. Kazap

    Kazap TYF Newbie

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    millimeter vs inch/die /tubing
    Good luck


    Envoyé de mon iPhone en utilisant Tapatalk
     
  6. Kirth Gersen

    Kirth Gersen TYF Newbie

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    I've used a "pro" grade Ridgid brand double flare set & never had problems on ordinary steel brake tubing tubing.

    Stainless tubing, OTOH, is nearly impossible without hydraulic-assisted, very $$ tools.

    A special copper-nickel alloy -- a common trademark name is "Cunifer" -- has been used for brake lines , for many years in some makes of imported cars, and is USA DOT approved. More corrosion resistant than steel, and much easier to fabricate. Some info: http://www.brakeconnect.com/4-reasons-to-use-cunifer-copper-nickel-brake-line
     

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