Budget brake upgrades

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Caddylack

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First of all:

This is not a thread to debate the adequacy of the stock brakes. I realize that the OEM setup can be maximized to perform quite well.

This is a thread for discussing affordable brake upgrades, specifically those using OEM parts from other vehicles.

The OEM rotors on the GMT900 have the following specs:
Outside diameter: 330 mm (13")
Thickness: 30 mm
Height: 55 mm

Here are the biggest questions that need concrete answers:

1. Do the stock calipers allow for any increase in rotor diameter or thickness?

2. If an appropriate caliper and bracket is used, is diameter limited by anything other than wheel size?

3. What are the concerns relating to track width and lateral spacing of the rotors?

Here are a few rotors in our bolt pattern that I have my eye on, listed from smallest to largest diameter:

1. 2010-2022 Toyota 4Runner and Lexus GX460
Outside diameter: 338.050 mm (13.3")
Thickness: 31.950 mm
Height: 68.3 mm

2. 2008-2022 Nissan Armada and Titan, plus Infiniti SUVs
Outside diameter: 350 mm (13.78")
Thickness: 30 mm
Height: 43.1 mm

3. 2019-2022 Ram 1500
Outside diameter: 378 mm (14.88")
Thickness: 30 mm
Height: 67.5 mm

As far as calipers:

The Toyota Tacoma has been using a 4-piston fixed front caliper since 1995, much to my surprise. They are cheap on Rock Auto.

The *** (VW Audi Group) Brembos are easy to come by at junkards. They could likely be easily adapted with a proper bracket.

(I actually have a full set of front and rear 4-piston Brembos for sale)

So... Who here knows stuff?
 
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mb1500

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No need to look anywhere other than the new OEM PPV brakes.

 

Geoffsfas10

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The factory calipers from the 19+ vehicles are 4 piston brembo styled, have a 13.5" rotors and are basically direct bolt ons. All you need to do is shim the caliper bolt ( and find calipers which are basically ghosts )
 
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Caddylack

Caddylack

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and find calipers which are basically ghosts
Okay, so there's that.

Rock Auto does not list a single 4-piston caliper for a 2019 Tahoe.

It does, however, list tons of dual-piston calipers labeled "Police".

Back to budget upgrades that can actually be purchased...
 
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Charlie207

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First of all:

This is not a thread to debate the adequacy of the stock brakes. I realize that the OEM setup can be maximized to perform quite well.

This is a thread for discussing affordable brake upgrades, specifically those using OEM parts from other vehicles.

Here are the biggest questions that need concrete answers:

1. Do the stock calipers allow for any increase in rotor diameter or thickness?

2. If an appropriate caliper and bracket is used, is diameter limited by anything other than wheel size?

3. What are the concerns relating to track width and lateral spacing of the rotors?

Here are a few rotors in our bolt pattern that I have my eye on, listed from smallest to largest diameter:

1. 2010-2022 Toyota 4Runner and Lexus GX460


2. 2008-2022 Nissan Armada and Titan, plus Infiniti SUVs


3. 2019-2022 Ram 1500


As far as calipers:

The Toyota Tacoma has been using a 4-piston fixed front caliper since 1995, much to my surprise. They are cheap on Rock Auto.

The *** (VW Audi Group) Brembos are easy to come by at junkards. They could likely be easily adapted with a proper bracket.

(I actually have a full set of front and rear 4-piston Brembos for sale)

So... Who here knows stuff?

What are the OEM GM specs? It would help to compare to the others listed.
 

Charlie207

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At what point do calipers and rotor sizes become moot? Eventually the tire size and vehicle weight will affect stopping more than what the factory installed for brakes.

I was under the assumption that bigger brakes don't stop any harder, they just give slightly more control.
 

Foggy

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Power stop makes good OE replacement brakes.. You can upgrade to
about 2-3 levels of types of pads and rotors.. IT's stock sized stuff... Just
upgraded to better performance. And it's inexpensive. I have them
on all of my cars currently and have been happy with them. ( i have 8 cars)
 
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Caddylack

Caddylack

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At what point do calipers and rotor sizes become moot? Eventually the tire size and vehicle weight will affect stopping more than what the factory installed for brakes.

I was under the assumption that bigger brakes don't stop any harder, they just give slightly more control.

Power stop makes good OE replacement brakes.. You can upgrade to
about 2-3 levels of types of pads and rotors.. IT's stock sized stuff... Just
upgraded to better performance. And it's inexpensive. I have them
on all of my cars currently and have been happy with them. ( i have 8 cars)

First of all:

This is not a thread to debate the adequacy of the stock brakes. I realize that the OEM setup can be maximized to perform quite well.

Larger rotors don't become moot until well past our 13" stockers. You can't name a modern performance truck/SUV with rotors that small.

The stock rotors on my little brother's Charger pursuit are 14.5"
Ford Explorer rotors get up to 14.3"
Ram 1500, as stated, 14.88"
If we get into SRT stuff... I think Trackhawk rotors are 16"

Larger rotors not only provide more clamping surface, but a larger piece of metal is more resistant to heat.

As far as calipers, spreading the clamping load out over a greater surface area and more pistons is "better". It's basically the same reason your engine has 8 cylinders and not 2 giant ones. F1 cars have brake pads that go all the way around the rotor like a ring.

"Fixed" calipers perform better than "floating" calipers.

If you want to get really fancy, the caliper bolts should be parallel to the surface of the rotor, not perpendicular. You normally only see this on race cars.
 
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Caddylack

Caddylack

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Okay, so there's that.

Rock Auto does not list a single 4-piston caliper for a 2019 Tahoe.

It does, however, list tons of dual-piston calipers labeled "Police".

Back to budget upgrades that can actually be purchased...
It appears the 21-22 SUVs use a 6-piston caliper. Basically the same as the BBK or the Brembos on the VW/Audi cars.

They cost $800 or so for the pair.

The rotors are 13.5". Will these fit inside the stock caliper?
 

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