Should I replace fuel pump pro-actively?

Discussion in 'Engine & Drivetrain' started by Cajun Jamie, Mar 16, 2019.

  1. Cajun Jamie

    Cajun Jamie Member

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    2006 5.3 with 180k. Stepper motor for fuel gauge went out so I replaced it. Planning a road trip from DFW to Panama City Beach, Fl in June (1600 miles round trip). I've had the truck 2 months, picked it up from a dealer, so I have 6 months, 6,000 miles powertrain warranty. I don't want to be stuck on the side of the road, and am wondering if I should drop the tank and put in a new Delphi fuel pump for peace of mind?

    I can handle the mechanics of it, and found a couple of good YouTube vids. I am seeing so signs or symptoms of any problems, just wondering if it should be done proactively?

    Thoughts? Thanks.

    JB
     
  2. SnowDrifter

    SnowDrifter Full Access Member

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    Honestly I wouldn't fuck with it until it needs to be fucked with. There are a lot of things that could fail at that mileage. These rigs have their issues, and replacing stuff proactively can easily run into the high 4 digit range minimum

    Other common things can can leave you stranded:
    Water pump/tstat
    Heater core connectors
    Radiator
    Transmission
    Differential
    Wheel bearings
    Ebrake linings



    If you need the peace of mind go for it. But like.... I think you're in for a tough time replacing everything that can break on a used truck. For better or for worse, that's one of the risks you take when you're road tripping with a 14 year old vehicle.
     
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  3. Cajun Jamie

    Cajun Jamie Member

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    Good points. Thank you. So I have records from the PO and that helps. Engine was replaced a year ago under extended warranty.
    I dropped the tranny pan and changed the filter, seal and 5qts fluid.

    Changed the rear diff seal and fluid.

    New pads and rotors on all 4.

    New tires, new Bilstein shocks.

    No oil loss or consumption. No coolant loss or consumption.

    Alignment done.

    So I can take my 2017 Outback to Florida, or the Tahoe. The Tahoe is more spacious and comfortable. I'm feeling adventurous. Road trip will be 400 miles then overnight with relatives, then 400 more. Return trip is the same.
     
  4. treehan77

    treehan77 TYF Fiend

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    Maybe carry a big rubber hammer with you. Sometimes pounding on the tank/pump will get it going till you can get it somewhere if it fails
     
  5. ScottyBoy

    ScottyBoy Full Access Member

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    I just drove my 2001 Suburban from Shreveport Louisiana all the way to Orlando FL and back in 2017. Could have very easily taken the wife's far more reliable 2014 Altima, but the interior room and sheer comfort of the Burban can not be beat! Even paying for twice as much fuel, we STILL decided to drive the Burban. I packed a tool bag with most tools I would need to do any emergency repairs, and off I went. The whole trip went fine without a single hiccup. Although before the trip, I did change the oil, top off all the other fluids, and I replaced the plastic quick connect fittings at the heater core since once of them cracked on me not too long before that. I also had four brand new tires put on about a month before the trip as well. That's another important thing, make sure you have GOOD tires before going on a road trip that far.
     
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  6. Cajun Jamie

    Cajun Jamie Member

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    That's encouraging to hear. Looking back at the PO's receipts, at least one heater core connector and 2 hoses were replaced in 2015. I put new Nitto's on a few weeks ago. I serviced the tranny and rear diff myself.Looks like most all these bases are covered. I think at least one wheel bearing has been replaced. I guess anything can happen, so I'll just look over the best I can and carry tools. :)
     
  7. rzabel

    rzabel TYF Newbie

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    Be adventurous!! I drive my 2003 Yukon XL 2500 down to Manzanillo, Mexico pulling a 25' trailer (and the trailer is even older, 1948!). That's 2500 miles one way. This is my second winter doing this. I make sure all service, maintenance, unusual noises, upgrades, etc. are all taken care of before the migration. It has 150k miles and the original fuel pump. I've had a few issues, but haven't been stranded yet (knock wood). IMG_2471.JPEG
     
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  8. ScottyBoy

    ScottyBoy Full Access Member

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    I drive back and forth to New Orleans several times a year, which is about 375 miles each way. (6 hour drive each way) and I ALWAYS bring tools. I carry a bag with pretty much every socket from 7mm up to 22mm, a few ratchets, a breaker bar, and a cordless impact gun. Oh, and zip ties, ALWAYS carry zip ties and some snips to cut them with. One time during a road trip in the wife's Altima we stopped in Baton Rouge for lunch and heard a scraping/dragging sound under the car. It was the damn plastics lower engine cover or splash shield dragging because the cheap plastic pop rivet things came out. I got dirty laying under the car, but I saved the day by securing it up to the body with zip-ties!
    Another thing, you mentioned that you serviced the transmission and rear differential yourself. Before the trip it would be a good idea to go over all that one more time and double check that ALL bolts are still torqued tight. If you have a white or yellow paint marker, draw a line over each bolt head so that you can just visually check it in the future to see if any bolts worked their way loose. If the paint line is broken, then you know the bolt backed out a bit. I ALWAYS check this prior to a long drive because a few years ago I had a brake caliper bolt come loose on me during a drive home from New Orleans. The rear caliper bracket bolt popped out at 75mph, then the caliper tilted down since it now only had one bolt, and it began rubbing on the inner wheel barrel. I head the "ping" of the bolt popping out, then the sound of metal rubbing on metal. I instantly became alarmed and tried to pull over and investigate. As soon as I hit the brake pedal, the caliper ended up digging into the wheel even harder, and instantly cut the wheel open just like a can opener cutting a can open. I still had no clue what the fuck happened at this point, I thought I had a blowout. But then I lost all brakes! My pedal went ALL the way to the floor. Luckily I didn't panic and I was able to safely slow the truck down and guide it to the shoulder. After looking at the cut wheel, busted brake line, busted rear shock, then seeing a caliper bracket bolt GONE, I figured out what happened and the noise I heard made sense now. A good Samaritan stopped to help as he thought he was going to just help me change a tire. I actually had all the tools to fix it, but I didn't have the PARTS. Thanks for smartphones, I was able to track down some parts stores somewhat close to where we were, and called to see if they had a brake caliper bolt and a brake hose. This gentleman who stopped ended up driving me about 30 miles each way to get these parts and some brake fluid and stuff. Then I patched up my truck and put the spare on and limped it the rest of the drive home on a busted shock. Ever since then, I ALWAYS carry tools, and I draw lines on bolts after I torque them down, so I can visually check and see if they have started to come loose.

    IMG_20160501_184312788.jpg Screenshot_2016-03-07-07-54-10.png Screenshot_2016-03-07-07-54-10.png
     
  9. ScottyBoy

    ScottyBoy Full Access Member

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    *Double Post*
     
  10. Cajun Jamie

    Cajun Jamie Member

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    Thanks! Really great advice! I do carry tools, and will double check everything. Glad I used loc-tite red on the big brake bolts and blue on the smaller one.

    I looked at the records again and the belts and heater hoses are new. Coolant flushed and replaced, new hoses.

    ONE heater core plastic T was replaced so I just ordered the second T plus the tools to quick release hoses. Will look into changing it asap.

    Thanks again!
     
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