A couple of tips for using exhaust manifold clamps

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Here’s a couple pics. The washers are real thick, maybe twice as thick as a regular washer. They’re also a bit bigger in diameter than the flanges on the bolt. All in all they’re a great product imo, like every single ARP product I’ve bought. I like the fact they seem like the clamping pressure would be good.
And very unlikely to break like the OE ones
 

Alex_M

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Exhaust bolts are pretty much the only bolts that I always antiseize.

ARP always comes with washers so you have a consistent mating surface for the bolt head to ride on making sure you reach a proper torque spec ... Or at least making it more likely.

I always replace exhaust manifold bolts. Just put a set of grade 12.9 Allen head bolts in my 2500, with washers. I like Allen's for header and manifold bolts, easier access. Hard to go wrong with the price of the ARP kit though, cost less than the hardware I got from the hardware store.
 

retiredsparky

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When I pulled the heads to redo the roller lifters (loud squeal that was obviously a needle bearing or more no longer rotating), I bought 8 mm studs for a Ford V-10.
The advantage? The studs are installed at much less torque, so are very unlikely to overstress either the male stud threads or the female threads in the aluminum head. I also had the cast iron manifolds machined-the flanges were warped and I didn’t want to invest in headers.
 

Rocket Man

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When I pulled the heads to redo the roller lifters (loud squeal that was obviously a needle bearing or more no longer rotating), I bought 8 mm studs for a Ford V-10.
The advantage? The studs are installed at much less torque, so are very unlikely to overstress either the male stud threads or the female threads in the aluminum head. I also had the cast iron manifolds machined-the flanges were warped and I didn’t want to invest in headers.
But when you torque the nuts down, doesn’t that torque the studs to the same value as the nuts? ARP sells stud kits for the LS engines also. If it was me, I’d use the hardware designed for an LS and follow the instructions that ARP supplied. I used their harmonic balancer bolts on mine which are reusable. The instructions were very specific. For something as critical as head bolts- I myself wouldn’t use studs not designed for the LS. And please don’t use the F- word here! ;)
 

retiredsparky

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Hello Mark,
Yes you are right that the torque applied to the nuts is the same as the torque applied to a head bolt. However, the nut is made of the same material as the stud. Steel is far better at resisting spalling, or friction caused crystallization of the thread material in the heads.When a steel bolt is tightened into aluminum threads, there is a sideways force applied to those threads and even with lubricant. There is a possibility that a previous mechanic has used unlubricated bolts, causing damage to those threads.
Anyone who has had spark plugs seize up in a head will have dealt with spalling. This issue is often solved by using a small amount of lubricant on the plug's threads or threaded inserts. That said, I would still prefer studs to bolts when attaching anything to aluminum.
Thanks for your comment,
Larry
 

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