When to Sell?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by kuslamb, Aug 28, 2018.

  1. CMoore711

    CMoore711 Full Access Member

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    I would much rather have a vehicle that's taken care of, maintained well, sorted out/lightly modified to my liking over the years of ownership, paid off and just drive it to as close to or above 200K before dumping. That's been my recipe for my last 2 DD's and I feel it's served me well. Hell, even in the last 2-3 years of ownership of vehicles getting closer to or over 200K miles, a $1,500-$2,000 repair once a year is still way cheaper than $850/month car payment.

    When it comes to DD's - Buy it, Drive it, Maintain it, Drive it, Repeat... If you take care of them right, no one will ever know there's 100-150K miles on it by looking at it.

    Just my 2 cents; Good luck in your decision.
     
  2. PwrdbyM

    PwrdbyM TYF Newbie

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    A huge depreciation factor is current deisgn or not. Once GM changes to the next generation design the current will drop in price. Right now your Yukon is essentially the same as the newest on the lot. It makes it worth more because someone can buy it used and still look like they're driving a 2019.
     
  3. cardude2000

    cardude2000 Full Access Member

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    I’m in a similar spot. My 2016 is beginning to let the gremlins creep in and I only have 40k miles. I’m waiting to see the 2020 and then will decide between that and the Lincoln. (Calm down everyone :)

    I suggest you wait until March when the new 2020 is debuted. If you like it, lock in a trade in price with the dealer and order one. If not, trade for a 2019. But at that point you are really driving a 6+ year old design, technology etc. for $75k or whatever you are going to pay that can be a tough one to swallow.

    If you wait you’re going to go over 100k and your value drops like a rock. I think the 2015+ will hold its value for a bit because there will be people who want the ‘older’ body style and suspension setup.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019 at 8:59 AM
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  4. Csurp

    Csurp Member

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    I would consider waiting for the second year of the new model.
     
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  5. TahoeFL2017

    TahoeFL2017 TYF Newbie

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    Sell it as soon as you can, once you are over 100k miles, it will be nearly impossible for a dealer to get it financed. So it becomes a cash sale or buy-here-pay-here deal with over 100k miles. I worked at a lot back in 1995, and we generally sold vehicles with 70-90k miles, just enough life in them to get financed(even though 200k is probably realistic for a Tahoe/Yukon) Agree with waiting for a 2020 if you can, body style changeover will definitely affect the depreciation.
     
  6. Wolfbraid

    Wolfbraid Full Access Member

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    Sell it to me for 5k... ;) that's the best advice .....
     
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  7. bsch3001

    bsch3001 TYF Newbie

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    I was told 90k was the cutoff point for financing when I traded one of mine in. It had 88+ on it and the dealer just asked that I keep it under 90k by a couple hundred if I could (needed to wait a few days for the new one to get in). They just said it limits the next buyers options if it is over the 90k mark - you could always try asking your local lender(s) if they have some mileage threshold where rates go up or they would just choose not to finance a vehicle. Seems like this would even vary depending on location, the buyer and typical reliability of the vehicle in question. The riskier it is for the lender the more they are going to need in return to take on that risk.
     

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