Soft brakes/vacuum lines

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Jonny_96tahoe

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Hey guys new here So I have this 1996 tahoe ls with the 5.7 thing used to be great until I did a Engine swap same engine and all except this one ran super cool made another discussion on that, my new issue here is that I need help figuring out my vacuum lines! I have pictures showing and saying where they all go but there’s also something on the driver side missing for vacuum ive seen other trucks like mine have & why my brakes could be soft now? Pads look fine fluid looks fine I’m thinking Do the vacuum lines have anything do to with this being hooked up wrong? Thanks guys appreciate any help & DONT ASK WHY I FORGOT THINGS or didn’t take things off old motor this was my first ever motor swap and I think I did pretty good for being done in 5 days except the couple little things forgotten. thanks again guysF3EFA213-5BAC-4AA0-9B97-60A5C01FD593.jpeg3C131C73-7403-4F63-8282-C9C732F92281.jpeg1113E70A-7654-48C7-9964-B022989BA181.jpeg53427965-4606-4417-9F82-5EF9D79D3986.jpeg2AC580AB-F585-4B1D-AFE0-42FCCF852AA8.jpeg
 

OR VietVet

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To help address the brakes....First pull the vacuum line at the booster, valve and all, and check for good vacuum pull when engine is running. Poor vacuum does not relate to what you are feeling but I just want that basic step out of the way. Lack of vacuum will cause the brake pedal to be harder, not softer. Think of how the brake pedal feels when applying the brakes with engine off and trying to stop a rolling rig. Softer brakes typically mean air in the hydraulic system or bad adjustment at the shoes or a caliper slide problem causing the caliper piston to travel too far before pad contacts the rotor. Did you brake open ANY hydraulic line, AT ALL, during the engine removal and install? Since you changed the engine, how long did the rig sit without moving before engine work was done? Forgot something, softer pedal can also be from a master cylinder bypassing internally. Unbolt that master cylinder and look at the back and see if you see fluid there. If you do, you need a master cylinder and hope that is the only problem, but it can still be dry there and still be bypassing internally.
 
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Jonny_96tahoe

Jonny_96tahoe

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To help address the brakes....First pull the vacuum line at the booster, valve and all, and check for good vacuum pull when engine is running. Poor vacuum does not relate to what you are feeling but I just want that basic step out of the way. Lack of vacuum will cause the brake pedal to be harder, not softer. Think of how the brake pedal feels when applying the brakes with engine off and trying to stop a rolling rig. Softer brakes typically mean air in the hydraulic system or bad adjustment at the shoes or a caliper slide problem causing the caliper piston to travel too far before pad contacts the rotor. Did you brake open ANY hydraulic line, AT ALL, during the engine removal and install? Since you changed the engine, how long did the rig sit without moving before engine work was done? Forgot something, softer pedal can also be from a master cylinder bypassing internally. Unbolt that master cylinder and look at the back and see if you see fluid there. If you do, you need a master cylinder and hope that is the only problem, but it can still be dry there and still be bypassing internally.
I’ll give those a go tmrw afternoon forsure ! and let you know! As it’s dark now and no didn’t hit any brake lines when swapping! Haven’t lost fluid by the looks of it & it sat for about 2 weeks before swap
 

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