Lube Slip Yoke - AWD

Discussion in 'Engine & Drivetrain' started by Hi-psi, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. Hi-psi

    Hi-psi Full Access Member

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    Ok...so I've read, and read, searched, and searched, and I'm still not clear on the topic fully.

    I know that all the late model GM SUV/trucks have a slip yoke on the front of the driveshaft, and over time/miles it gets to where it doesn't slip so well and results in a bit of a drive line clunk. I've dealt with something similar on my F250 that has a two-piece driveshaft with a slip joint in the middle.

    Ok, so... I've read that some of the solutions, fixes, etc are...

    A new nickel plated yoke. Read than even some of the newer models came with one from the factory. Read that this fixes the problem, but it will eventually return.

    Racket ball trick/hack. Putting part of a rubber racket ball down into the yoke, thus providing somewhat of an insulated "cushion" so that when the yoke slips, you don't get as pronounce of a "clunk"

    Pull the drive shaft and re-lube the yoke. Now, here's where I get a little confused. I've read that on the 2wd models, just pull it, throw your grease/lube of choice in there, slap it back in. However, I've read that on the 4wd/awd models, you shouldn't do this because you risk contaminating the transfer case with the grease. That you're supposed to basically use the same fluid/oil you'd put in the transfer case, the factory stuff being called Auto-Trak II (AC Delco brand).

    Just looking for a little insight, personal experience, and ideally someone that has addressed the issue on their 4wd/awd model.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. thompsoj22

    thompsoj22 Full Access Member

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    Ill also wait for experience to answer, IMO there isnt much in a transfer case that grease would affect? But i would like to know if the spline's are dry upon inspection from others that have been there done that.
     
  3. drakon543

    drakon543 Full Access Member

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    you can grease your slip yoke without concern. it probably wont help as much as you want but there isnt any legitimate concern for this. unless ofcourse your greasing it with a whole tube of grease. slide it out add maybe a pump or 2 worth of grease on the shaft and put it back in. there will be some "contamination" if you can even call it that of grease into the oil but using a small amount will not have any adverse effect.
     
  4. soulsea

    soulsea Super Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  5. drakon543

    drakon543 Full Access Member

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    believe what you will a light coating of grease isn't going to amount to any legitimate contamination concerns. as i mentioned in my previous post a single pump from a grease gun smeared on the shaft. people trying to use grease as bushing pumping half a tube in there..... if the op wants to only half read my post and attempt to keep shoving grease in there until his noise stops thats his problem.
     
  6. cmc76

    cmc76 Full Access Member

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    Not that it is a fix exactly. But when I lowered my tahoe, and lubed the yoke. The clunk went away almost entirely.
    On rare occasion it still will. But I attribute it to the angle
     
  7. swathdiver

    swathdiver Full Access Member

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    The owner's manual says to use synthetic grease (12345879) on the slip yoke, doesn't matter if it is 2WD or 4WD. Mine was starting to clunk and after towing it has stopped and not returned. Still haven't gotten around to greasing the slip yoke either! One of these days...
     
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  8. Hi-psi

    Hi-psi Full Access Member

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    I'm well aware that greasing it isn't a permanent fix. More so just becomes a semi-regular maintenance thing. I.e, every oil change (or every other) grease the yoke.

    I'm use to that approach with my F250.

    Ford actually sells a specific grease for their two piece driveshaft slip joint. It's a specially formulated teflon based grease. I have a tube of that already that I use with my F250. I may give it a shot.

    https://www.amazon.com/Genuine-Ford-Fluid-XG-8-Lubricant/dp/B000NU77DA
     
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  9. 510man

    510man TYF Newbie

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    I had the driveshaft clunk in a '99 2WD. I greased it with various types of grease looking for a solution. None worked long term................................until I used the GM grease listed in the TSB. That was May 2017 and no issues. You want the stuff below. Anything else and you're wasting your time. I got a tube of this GM stuff on ebay for $7.85. It's out there now for $45, which is what the dealer wants. Shop around. $45 for a little tube of grease is just stupid.

    GM Fluid 12345996 High-Temperature Grease
     
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  10. Bill Hayes

    Bill Hayes TYF Newbie

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    I had a 99 Z71 and it had the clunk. I used never seize on the splines, and the noise did not come back for 50,000 miles before I finally sold the truck.
     

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