Best Wheel bearing and transmission filter change

Discussion in 'Engine & Drivetrain' started by ladorn45, Aug 4, 2018.

  1. ladorn45

    ladorn45 Full Access Member

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    Hey Everyone,

    So just want to get everyones opinion on what they think is the best wheel bearing hub. I started to get the abs kicking in on low speeds again. This is the third time i will be replacing a wheel bearing hub in the last 3 years and this time around I want to buy the part rather then having the mechanic buy it. What do you guys suggest. I read that moog makes good ones, but any suggestion with link would be great. Also figured it was time to do a transmission filter change, but I read that its not always a good idea to do it with transmissions that has over 120k on them any thoughts. Thanks everyone

    2001 tahoe
    125k miles on it
     
  2. Bombsquad85

    Bombsquad85 Full Access Member

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    Not sure about the trans filter but I put 2 timken hubs ok the truck a couple months ago and have had 0 issues. I just checked them the other day and they still look new (a little dirty but no visible problems and are still nice and tight)
     
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  3. mattbta

    mattbta Full Access Member

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    For hubs, without a doubt as said above, Timken. Do it once and do it right.
     
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  4. Chubbs

    Chubbs Full Access Member

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    Remove the transmission pan, replace the filter and reassemble with a 4l60e "deep pan" kit. Comes with filter, gasket and filter seal. Refill with dexron 6, synthetic, approx 5 qt. after refilling, make sure the level reaches the "cold" indicator on dipstick. The truck has to be driven and trans fluid up to operating temp where the level is then checked again at the upper indicator within the hash marks. You want it at the very max fill.

    Read the directions for reassembling the sump & new gasket, using a 1/4" drive torque wrench. The sealing surfaces must be properly cleaned & prepped, bolts torque-to-specs or a leak will result.

    I suggest using a manual hand-pump for extracting the trans fluid from the dipstick fill as a mess is easily made removing a full sump, especially working on the ground. A shop manual should be used as a guide since the trans shift lever and possibly the exhaust moved in order to completely remove the sump. It's just a bitch of a job working on your back and the linkage bolts are not easily dealt with. I have 4wd and was able to get the sump out with linkage removal only. Others have pulled front driveshaft & Y-pipe. Overtightening the pan bolts will also compromise gasket. It's a 2-stage tightening sequence to compress the new gasket properly.

    If the transmission fluid is dark and/or smells burnt then it may already have limited life. I wouldn't forego the fluid replace as it may extend the life just know if you wipe the current trans fluid off the dipstick on a white towel or napkin and clearly see particles you may be looking at clutch material or otherwise and its life expectancy is already par for course and you may just want to leave it be.

    While you are underneath the truck, drain & refill the differential/s. The back 1 requires removal of the cover so you will want to pick up a gasket for 8.5/8.6, 10-bolt rear end. 75-90 wt synthetic lube, 2.5 (3-qt)
    If you have 4wd it's more imperative that the front diff fill level is checked at the very least and I would service it before anything as they tend to burn up if left unserviced/uninspected due to leaky seals and neglect altogether. The rear diff tends to be more robust but I wouldn't skimp on anything as time & lube comes cheaper than all-out repair & replacement.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2018
  5. Chubbs

    Chubbs Full Access Member

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    CAUTION
    Caution

    When the transmission is at operating temperatures, take necessary precautions when removing the drain plug, to avoid being burned by draining fluid.



    1. [​IMG]



      Click to Enlarge
      Raise and suitably support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.

    2. Place a drain pan under the transmission oil pan.

    3. Remove the oil pan drain plug, if equipped.

    4. If necessary, remove the bolts and position aside the range selector cable bracket for clearance while lowering the pan. It is not necessary to remove the cable from the lever or bracket.

    5. Remove the catalytic converter. Refer to Catalytic Converter Replacement (4.8L,5.3L) | Catalytic Converter Replacement (6.0L and 8.1L Engines).

    6. Remove the oil pan bolts from the front and sides of the pan only.

    7. Loosen the rear oil pan bolts approximately 4 turns.

    8. Lightly tap the oil pan with a rubber mallet in order to loosen the pan to allow the fluid to drain.

    9. [​IMG]



      Click to Enlarge
      Remove the remaining oil pan bolts.

    10. [​IMG]



      Click to Enlarge
      Remove the oil pan and the gasket.

    11. [​IMG]



      Click to Enlarge
      Grasp firmly while pulling down with a twisting motion in order to remove the filter.

    12. [​IMG]



      Click to Enlarge
      Remove and discard the filter seal. The filter seal may be stuck in the pump; if necessary, carefully use pliers or another suitable tool to remove the seal.

    13. Inspect the fluid color.

    14. Inspect the filter. Pry the metal crimping away from the top of the filter and pull apart. The filter may contain the following evidence for root cause diagnosis:
      • Clutch material

      • Bronze slivers indicating bushing wear

      • Steel particles
    15. Clean the transmission case and the oil pan gasket surfaces with solvent, and air dry. You must remove all traces of the old gasket material.
    Installation Procedure
    1. [​IMG]



      Click to Enlarge
      Coat the NEW filter seal with automatic transmission fluid.

    2. Install the NEW filter seal into the transmission case. Tap the seal into place using a suitable size socket.

    3. Install the NEW filter.

    4. [​IMG]



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      Install the oil pan and NEW gasket.

    5. [​IMG]



      Click to Enlarge


      NOTE
      Notice

      Refer to Fastener Notice in Cautions and Notices.



      Install the oil pan bolts.


      Tighten
      Tighten the bolts alternately and evenly to 16 N·m (12 lb ft).

    6. Install the catalytic converter. Refer to Catalytic Converter Replacement (4.8L,5.3L) | Catalytic Converter Replacement (6.0L and 8.1L Engines).

    7. If previously removed, install the range selector cable bracket and bolts.


      Tighten
      Tighten the bolts to 25 N·m (18 lb ft).

    8. Apply a small amount of sealant GM P/N 12346004 (Canadian P/N 10953480), or equivalent to the threads of the oil pan drain plug, if equipped.

    9. Install the oil pan drain plug, if equipped.


      Tighten
      Tighten the plug to 18 N·m (13 lb ft).

    10. Lower the vehicle.

    11. Fill the transmission to the proper level with DEXRON® VI transmission fluid. Refer to Transmission Fluid Level and Condition Check and Fluid Capacity Specifications.

    12. Check the COLD fluid level reading for initial fill only.

    13. Inspect the oil pan gasket for leaks.
     
  6. swathdiver

    swathdiver Full Access Member

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    X3 on Timkin hubs, don't forget to change the axle shaft bolt if 4WD.
     
  7. SnowDrifter

    SnowDrifter Full Access Member

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    x4 for timken LOL

    In addition to what's been said... Little bit of antiseize on the splines (NOT THREADS). Torque it to spec with a torque wrench. With a torque wrench. Torque wrench. i̶m̶p̶a̶ TORQUE WRENCH. Don't forget the indent on the nut when you're done. 165ftlbs

    For the transmission: You need to do your due diligence. 120k or 220k doesn't matter. Inspect the fluid, smell it, examine it. If it smells burnt, has particulate or chunks it it, don't bother changing it. Instead, start transmission shopping. That rule of thumb came around because folks would try to change the fluid after the trans was fucked, expecting a fix, when in reality, it's still fucked and the only thing allowing the clutches to grab was the grittyness of the fluid.

    If you don't have the tool to remove the pickup tube seal, sit down and think hard if you want to risk messing something up before you dig into it with your pliers and picks. They typically don't fail and shouldn't need to be replaced under normal use. All I'm getting at is: If you have the tool or a means of getting it out without marring anything, great, if not; consider the risk/reward

    It should take around 4.5qts (deep pan), mind which filter you get when shopping - there's a shallow and a deep pan. Shallow is flat, deep has a shoulder. Filters are different

    Oh yeah and instead of bending the shifter cable bracket out of the way like almost everyone says, just reach up and unbolt it. 2 torx screws and it swings out of the way giving you all the room you need to drop the pan

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2018
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  8. SnowDrifter

    SnowDrifter Full Access Member

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    Oh yeah and you don't need to touch the exhaust. There's plenty of space :2cents:
     
  9. ladorn45

    ladorn45 Full Access Member

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    Wow thanks guys. If i was to change the transmission fluid I would have a shop do it. Way past my comfort zone. And Timken it is. Thank you so much for all your guys input.
     
  10. ladorn45

    ladorn45 Full Access Member

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    One more question and this might be a dumb one. where do you guys prefer to buy your parts. I was just going to buy it from amazon but i know sometimes manufactures warranties do not apply to amazon orders.
     

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