3.0L Duramax Towing?

Disclaimer: Links on this page pointing to Amazon, eBay and other sites may include affiliate code. If you click them and make a purchase, we may earn a small commission.

Spike045

TYF Newbie
Joined
Sep 23, 2022
Posts
7
Reaction score
4
Does anyone have some first hand experience comparing the towing ability between the 3.0L to the 6.2L? Mostly going to use this to tow my 24ft boat when not using my 3/4 ton.
 

suterusu

Full Access Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2022
Posts
255
Reaction score
135
The diesel makes the same torque but its peak is right off idle. When it comes to towing, everything is superior if you're only looking at 6.2L vs. 3.0L. The low end torque, fuel economy, and reliability (so far) really shine with the duramax.
 

Spike045

TYF Newbie
Joined
Sep 23, 2022
Posts
7
Reaction score
4
The diesel makes the same torque but its peak is right off idle. When it comes to towing, everything is superior if you're only looking at 6.2L vs. 3.0L. The low end torque, fuel economy, and reliability (so far) really shine with the duramax.
Awesome, that’s exactly what I was hoping to hear. Thanks!
 

steiny93

Full Access Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2021
Posts
392
Reaction score
327
Does anyone have some first hand experience comparing the towing ability between the 3.0L to the 6.2L? Mostly going to use this to tow my 24ft boat when not using my 3/4 ton.

I have an Ice Castle fish house that weights 7500lbs and a 21ft boat both of which I've pulled a lot (thousands of miles with both) with a 6.2 and the Ram ecoDiesel (I haven't pulled either with the wife's 3.0 DMax).

The Ice Castle has the 6.2 up on rpm and using a pile of fuel on the interstate (5-7mpg). You definitely are wanting more power on the interstate, maintaining 75mph doesn't just happen. The ecoDiesel isn't much different in that you would like more power, it's being worked pretty hard, wind makes it worse. The ecoDiesel will do 12-14mpg depending on the wind and if you have to run straight #1.

If anything the ecoDiesel feels better in that you aren't screaming rpm's; but I wouldn't say it outperforms or underperforms against the 6.2 when you are close to 8k lbs (they are both working hard). With lighter loads (like the boat) the 6.2 feels quicker but still stuffers in the mileage category. Personally I would rather pull with the diesel as the range is significantly longer, the 6.2 has you stopping for fuel more often then you need to pee :).
 

Stbentoak

Full Access Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2020
Posts
1,521
Reaction score
1,657
I have an Ice Castle fish house that weights 7500lbs and a 21ft boat both of which I've pulled a lot (thousands of miles with both) with a 6.2 and the Ram ecoDiesel (I haven't pulled either with the wife's 3.0 DMax).

The Ice Castle has the 6.2 up on rpm and using a pile of fuel on the interstate (5-7mpg). You definitely are wanting more power on the interstate, maintaining 75mph doesn't just happen. The ecoDiesel isn't much different in that you would like more power, it's being worked pretty hard, wind makes it worse. The ecoDiesel will do 12-14mpg depending on the wind and if you have to run straight #1.

If anything the ecoDiesel feels better in that you aren't screaming rpm's; but I wouldn't say it outperforms or underperforms against the 6.2 when you are close to 8k lbs (they are both working hard). With lighter loads (like the boat) the 6.2 feels quicker but still stuffers in the mileage category. Personally I would rather pull with the diesel as the range is significantly longer, the 6.2 has you stopping for fuel more often then you need to pee :).
All these 1/2 ton vehicles advertise they "Can" pull 8-10-even 12k Lbs. And they can.. but how well and what does it put them thru to do it on a regular basis?
If it's here or there and an occasional under 100-mile trip, either will be fine. But if you are doing grades and distances, sounds to me more like a 2500 is in order. You need everything that comes with it, HD cooling, tranny coolers, Bigger Brakes, and the like. I've pulled those same loads and even with my 5.9L 2500 RAM, I still know its back there....
 

crankin

Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2022
Posts
73
Reaction score
35
I have a 2022 Yukon XL Denali with the 6.2, No max tow, No air ride just the magnetic suspension, towing a 32' Travel trailer weighing about 7200 lbs. Yukon is rated for 7800lbs. I use a Husky TS centerline weight distribution hitch. 1 inch sag in the back and 1/8 to 1/4 raise in the front. I inflated the rear tires to max pressure to try and take some sway out due to the independant suspension. overall it tows fine. On some real windy days can definitley feel it and slow down a bit but at the end of the day you are towing a huge kite. I had a 3.0L on order but it was never picked up and was able to get into the 6.2L as someone backed out of the deal. I think you would have no issues.
 

Jellyfrosh

Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2022
Posts
50
Reaction score
44
It'll probably pull it fine, controlling it at speed is another issue.
 

steiny93

Full Access Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2021
Posts
392
Reaction score
327
All these 1/2 ton vehicles advertise they "Can" pull 8-10-even 12k Lbs. And they can.. but how well and what does it put them thru to do it on a regular basis?
If it's here or there and an occasional under 100-mile trip, either will be fine. But if you are doing grades and distances, sounds to me more like a 2500 is in order. You need everything that comes with it, HD cooling, tranny coolers, Bigger Brakes, and the like. I've pulled those same loads and even with my 5.9L 2500 RAM, I still know its back there....
I also have a 2500 Ram mega with a Cummins and an HDT with a Cummins ISM.
The 1/2's handle 7500lbs well enough, in the winter I use the 1/2's over the 3/4 as having auto 4wd is a big plus on ice.
Other then the lack of auto, bigger is better for towing (daily driving a mega cab is horrible) but regardless you know the load is present.
 

semperfidevil

TYF Newbie
Joined
Jan 6, 2023
Posts
5
Reaction score
1
I think it depends on your comfort level towing. We have a 21 Denali with the 6.2, max trailering, and air suspension. We also have a 21 Jayco 24MBH which is 29.5’ long and weighs 6800 empty and 7600 max gross. I had a curt WDH with it originally and I was being pushed around like crazy and really upset I let the DW talk me into the Yukon instead of my 3500 Sierra. I was really looking forward to the 900+ ftlbs of torque.

I then put the equalizer with four point sway control on and I can barely tell the trailer is behind me. This weekend I drove from Denver to Ridgeway CO and had to take several passes which in my opinion would push the vehicle to the max. On the way there we found out the road we were taking was closed due to construction at the time we were coming through and had to change our route over Hoosier pass. Then we had to go up and down vail pass. In both situations the Yukon pulled up the passes and did a great job. Yes I wasn’t going 80 over them but I was moving plenty fast for having a 30’ trailer behind me. On the descents the unit did a great job grade shifting. I didn’t have to once engage the manual shift mode. I only had a few brake applications down vail pass. Having the brake controller setup properly with the right amount of gain really helped ensure I didn’t over work the Yukons breaks too much while also doing the same for the trailer.

I think the only limiting factor is the wheel base. Being shorter the trailer will push around at times in heavy winds. On the way to ridgeway for example the winds were howling at 15-25 knots. I ended up going from a comfortable speed of 67 to about 64 and sometimes 58. If I felt any sway at all I either gave it a little gas or applied the trailer breaks gently and corrected it with no problem. On the way home we had no winds and I found myself pushing towards 74 at times very comfortably. I easily maintained 67 even going up the passes. I had no sway either. So in my case the winds are a big factor.

One other thing to keep an eye on is the payload. While the vehicle has a payload at either 1400 or 1600 pounds roughly, the hitch is limited to 800 pounds. I have no doubt with my setup I’m pushing those limits. The right WDH being setup properly is definitely needed.

So in short, it sounds like the trailer your getting won’t be a problem. Take your time and know your limits. I think you’ll be really happy with your setup.

Has the Air Ride Adaptive Suspension system worked well when you are towing your Jayco? Does the system do a good job of keeping the trailer leveled with the truck (not sagging)? Thanks for sharing your experience!

 

ItIsWhatItIs

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2021
Posts
75
Reaction score
88
We have a 22 Tahoe 3.0 with Max Trailering and air suspension. Travel Trailer is a lighter, 4,900lbs dry, unit but with a family of five gets loaded pretty well. Never weighed it to see but my guess is after bikes and everything probably close to 6k. Oh and it’s 31’ ball to bumper. I had plenty of trailering experience before this and I’m the previous tow vehicle was a 2020 Ram EcoDiesel. In my opinion the Tahoe is better than the Ram I every way for towing so far. The air ride smoothed everything out for a more planted and controlled feel (and yes it auto levels itself once you drop the trailer on). The transmission is far superior to the Ram and never seems to be guessing what gear to be in.

But in regards to whether or not it will safely handle that specific trailer has a lot to do with the driver and how driven. Sure the Tahoe can handle but how comfortable are you on long trips. Our longest trip to date in the Tahoe is 250ish miles each way at 70-75mph through northern Arizona which isn’t the easiest terrain and my wife, who gets very anxious when we tow, had no issues.

Oh and last point, the short length may not be the best for towing however what a turning radius! I’ve gotten into and out of spots I never would have considered in the Ram. HOWEVER, watch out for jack knifing, I’ve had 2 close calls forgetting how tight to Tahoe can pivot.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
128,349
Posts
1,797,888
Members
91,138
Latest member
jonlwold

Latest posts

Top