Well, what would you do?

Snowbound

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First, I would highly recommend staying out of the hospital at all costs. Hope all is well.

I always put a little pag oil on o-rings and seals. Just helps them seat in place. Maybe it’s not recommended but I’ve always done it without issue.
How long are we talking before leak developed? A week, month, year? Could the condenser be leaking above the fitting and running down to that connection? Maybe on the backside where you can’t see it? I’ve seen people over tighten the bolt and fracture the tube where it meets the aluminum block. Some of them rubber encapsulated metal washer seals can be slightly larger than OEM or even egg shaped straight out of package. Could you have gotten a bad seal? Hate to see you replace line and condenser only because of a bad seal but I hear what your saying about doing it once.
Usually a bad line leaks at the crimped fitting not the connector unless it got smacked or cut.
And yes, the system should hold vacuum indefinitely unless there is a leak. I don’t know anyone who holds vacuum for more than an hour while checking for leaks. If it doesn’t lose vacuum within the first 30 minutes chances are it won’t.

And what’s up with the lack of pictures? Don’t you know we are all picture ****** and live by the motto, pics or it didn’t happen. I would like to see the surfaces if it’s apart.
 

Snowbound

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And the oil is constantly running thru the system. After is sits idle the oil does find all the low spots and the compressor is one of them low spots. That is why I put a deslugger on both my vehicles that have the low compressor. What your seeing as your leak is actually the oil. Technically, when you recharge you should put more oil in but there’s no way to know how much to add or how much stayed in system. It’s a guessing game really. But if you replace compressor, condenser, accumulator and orifice, assume the system is empty of all oil and put in specified amount minus what came in the new compressor (they all should come with oil in them and should say how much). Then compressor should be turned over by hand once installed and charged so you don’t hydro-lock it.
 

swathdiver

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First, I would highly recommend staying out of the hospital at all costs. Hope all is well.

I always put a little pag oil on o-rings and seals. Just helps them seat in place. Maybe it’s not recommended but I’ve always done it without issue.
How long are we talking before leak developed? A week, month, year? Could the condenser be leaking above the fitting and running down to that connection? Maybe on the backside where you can’t see it? I’ve seen people over tighten the bolt and fracture the tube where it meets the aluminum block. Some of them rubber encapsulated metal washer seals can be slightly larger than OEM or even egg shaped straight out of package. Could you have gotten a bad seal? Hate to see you replace line and condenser only because of a bad seal but I hear what your saying about doing it once.
Usually a bad line leaks at the crimped fitting not the connector unless it got smacked or cut.
And yes, the system should hold vacuum indefinitely unless there is a leak. I don’t know anyone who holds vacuum for more than an hour while checking for leaks. If it doesn’t lose vacuum within the first 30 minutes chances are it won’t.

And what’s up with the lack of pictures? Don’t you know we are all picture ****** and live by the motto, pics or it didn’t happen. I would like to see the surfaces if it’s apart.
I did take a photo of the leak to show the dealer but in the end decided to make the repair ourselves. I promise to photograph the repair next time! Well, I'll have my kids take photos and send them to me for posting!

We triple checked and the leak was coming from that fitting though it is possible that I made it worse as the aluminum started to bend with even light pressure when tightening the bolt. When it leaked again, it was several days later, not right away.
 

PNW VietVet

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I didn't use any oil, only evacuated the refrigerant, not the oil. I thought that most of the oil resides in the compressor, no?
Oil will gather in bottom of compressor, the evaporator and the condenser. That is why I like to flush and then start with a full charge of oil in the system. Minus what may be shipped in the compressor if you are replacing the compressor.
 

swathdiver

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Oil will gather in bottom of compressor, the evaporator and the condenser. That is why I like to flush and then start with a full charge of oil in the system. Minus what may be shipped in the compressor if you are replacing the compressor.
Well, we're only going to replace the accumulator and condenser and the line between the two. I reckon we can drain the oil from the condenser, measure it, and put some fresh oil in the new one?
 

PNW VietVet

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Your call. I did a lot of a/c work in KC, Mo. and I had a way I did it but not everyone agreed with my methods but I like to know a/c oil levels and not guess. Your way is assuming the oil level was correct before opening system. My way, IMO, takes the guess work out of it but again, I am spending your money.
 

swathdiver

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Your call. I did a lot of a/c work in KC, Mo. and I had a way I did it but not everyone agreed with my methods but I like to know a/c oil levels and not guess. Your way is assuming the oil level was correct before opening system. My way, IMO, takes the guess work out of it but again, I am spending your money.
A flush would entail using a recovery machine and disconnecting the compressor and draining the oil from it right?

On 1980s cars, it was SOP to replace the accumulator, is that still so with these trucks? My compressor's clutch has gotten noisy over the years, a new clutch kit is about $170 but the whole compressor is just under $200 from RA. This project can get out of hand real quick! LOL
 
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swathdiver

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Your call. I did a lot of a/c work in KC, Mo. and I had a way I did it but not everyone agreed with my methods but I like to know a/c oil levels and not guess. Your way is assuming the oil level was correct before opening system. My way, IMO, takes the guess work out of it but again, I am spending your money.
So does a recovery machine remove all of the oil from the system or does the compressor have to be removed and drained? @PNW VietVet
 

donjetman

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The recovery machine does NOT remove all the oil.

Years ago, when I changed out a frozen compressor on our 02 Surburban, I didn't have a recovery machine. I opened all lines and blew a solvent thru them that's designed for the job, then compressed air, then buttoned everything up, installed new compressor and accumulator/dryer. The new compressor had oil in it. I followed the directions that came with the compressor/accumulator/dryer kit. I honestly can't remember if it said to add additional oil into the accumulator or not? Anyway I vaccuumed down the system(no leaks) and added R134. The result was awesome. I hope this helps
 

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