GM better come up with something better than their current engine lineups

TollKeeper

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What exactly is the Mt. Evans Loop? Been up near there to hike Hells Hole.
Thats just the term their company gives it. Drive up to Idaho Springs, head up to Mt Evans, but instead of turning off on the road that actually takes you to Mt Evans, you keep going, and it brings you out in Genesee I think.
 

Fless

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Thats just the term their company gives it. Drive up to Idaho Springs, head up to Mt Evans, but instead of turning off on the road that actually takes you to Mt Evans, you keep going, and it brings you out in Genesee I think.

Ok, I've done that drive many times. I need to do a little summer hiking from the Echo Lake site, tracking with my hiking GPS. That way I can follow the right path when I snowshoe. In the winter, the snowshoers go everywhere and one can't follow an actual trail.
 

Bill 1960

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Good thing because the Toyota's 437hp and 583 lb-ft of torque from the I-Force Max engine blows away the Eco Boost. In fact those numbers are better than most V8s. just curious too see how this power train holds up. I grew up under the " There is no replacement for displacement" rule like many of us on here :) LOL
Um, the F150 V6 hybrid is 430/570. Which means nothing more than Ford hit the market first, and Toyota simply tweaked the programming to be #1. Until the next round of one-upmanship takes place.

Don’t take this as disdain for T, I think they’re tops in reliability engineering. Yet they have a long term conservative approach that has never kept them on top of the HP wars any length of time. FCA has been selling trucks with outrageously high numbers for a while. Ford has versions of the EB running at much higher states of tune in other vehicles. All of these forced induction vehicles are just a tune away from significantly different output.
 

TollKeeper

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The irony about that, the 4.2 engine found in the GMT360, and the 4.0 found in the jeeps, both Inline 6's, were dropped because of issues meeting emission standards.

Than GM brings in a I-6 diesel, and doesnt have issues? Why does this not make sense?
 

Bill 1960

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The irony about that, the 4.2 engine found in the GMT360, and the 4.0 found in the jeeps, both Inline 6's, were dropped because of issues meeting emission standards.

Than GM brings in a I-6 diesel, and doesnt have issues? Why does this not make sense?
I don’t buy their rationale for a moment. Marketing has conditioned consumers to expect and demand “new and improved”. Corporate shills push the engineers to give them something different. And of course engineering needs to rationalize a budget and headcount. And so the wheel turns.
Just watch any automotive review. Anything not fresh off the drawing board is “dated”, “showing it’s age”, or “ancient” if its a 4Runner.
Today, they’ll sell the advantages of a compact V. Tomorrow sing the praises of a smooth in-line.

My opinion is retiring a successful engine while laying the blame on the EPA is just more marketing genius at work.
 

fr8bil

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As I recently explained to our ex-SIL who was buying a twin-turbo Ford F-150, a turbocharger requires owner-understanding that like a set of brakes, a turbo will eventually wear-out and fail. You can extend their life by using only top-rated synthetic oil like Amsoil's Signature series and changing it more frequently but turbo wear and tear occurs at time of shut-down when they are still spinning and very hot and all of sudden the oil-supply stops and oil "coking" occurs. Having owned a Y2K F-350 with the older 7.3 Powerstroke and putting over 500K on it over 12 years I acquired a lot of knowledge about care and feeding of one large turbo and very early in the first month of ownership installed an ISSPRO turbo-temp monitor thermocouple in the downpipe that prevented fuel shutoff until the thermocouple in the downpipe said it had cooled to less than 300 F. Manufacturers are now trying to convince turbo engine owners, that have enough understanding to inquire, that thermal convection will continue to move the coolant past the turbo to sufficiently cool it after engine shut off.....LMAO ! All this is ignoring the introduction of oil vapors from the PCV system into the multiple intercooler and pressurized intake hoses that can lead to blow-off of said hoses from their metal mounting surfaces. There's a definite reason Ford tech's ( one of my best and closest friends happens to have been one at a very large Dealer before he went to Mercedes) will opt, like Bill 1960 posted, for the V-8's on their personal vehicles.
 

TahoeFL2017

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Thinking the electric transition is going to be front and center for all the OEMs going forward. Hanging on to my 5.3 as long as possible!
 

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