Comtemplating 08 Hybrid, 80k miles

Discussion in 'Hybrid General Discussion' started by NateDiggity, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. NateDiggity

    NateDiggity Member

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    As my wife and I search for a new to us vehicle after her beloved Hyundai veracruz was totalled by an 18 year old I am constantly unimpressed with what is available in our price range....

    Then, I found a 08 Yukon denali hybrid with the 6.0.

    I have owned 3 different LS engine trucks, an 8.1, duramax and a 07 Yukon XL Denali. I like GM (as you can tell) and I really like the look of this yukon I'm looking at.

    With all that said, I don't know much about the hybrids, I have looked up in the last few hours about them, and it looks like absolute worst case scenario I would have to replace a battery pack at a touch over 2,000 bucks... is that accurate?

    My 07 6.2 had issues, but I traded it at 175k so the miles were high. I replaced the pickup tube o-ring, oil pressure sensor (what a PITA), had a bad backup sensor, really all the typical GM stuff. I also work at a family business with 15 GM 01-new trucks, and currently drive a 2012 6.0 2500hd with 205k miles on it, and have another 06 with 260k that drives 200 miles each day. I know what to expect gas engine wise.

    What do I need to look for specifically on the hybrids?

    Is there any way to "check the health" of the battery pack? I have a cheap 0bd2 scan tool as well as the torque lite app on my phone, I can upgrade that to the paid version if needed (I used this a lot to monitor oil pressure on the 07 denali with the o-ring issue digitally)

    I have an Associates in Electronic Technology from YEARS ago that I do not use (forgot most of it lol) but I am far from electronically dumb....

    Other than that I think I can check everything else out myself, although I am really turned off by the no spare tire..... ugh
     
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  2. iamdub

    iamdub We need a new plague.

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    I don't see the point of the hybrid. I know it's better MPG (EPA estimated 7 MPG city, 2 MPG highway over the non-hybrid), but is it so much better that it'll save you more than the cost of a replacement battery pack over the time/mileage you plan to own the vehicle? If you need to dump 2-3 grand soon after buying it, it'll take quite a while just to break even on the fuel savings. Even longer if you do more highway driving than city commuting. Then again, those MPG figures are EPA estimates and real world results may (usually will) vary. There's a reason GM dropped the program.

    My advice is to pass on it. But, to answer your battery health question, you can see what the PCM says with a Tech2. MAYBE some one-way scan tools ("code readers") can see this info, but a Tech2 can for sure.
     
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  3. swathdiver

    swathdiver Full Access Member

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    We've had two guys on here in the past year and both had problems with AFM with theirs. Remember that one guy Chris with the mechanic situation? That was a nightmare but that guy didn't know anything about cars and was taken for a couple of rides! One also needed the transmission rebuilt, none that I recall mentioned the battery pack.

    You could look for a XFE model Tahoe or Yukon, these got about 1 mpg more than the regular trucks. Or look for a 2WD truck with a 3.08 gear if mileage is that important. A good tune will also increase mileage some.

    Depending on where you live and availability, Ethanol usually costs less to run than gasoline and when it comes down to it, how much it costs to drive per mile has more of an affect on our wallets than how many miles per gallon we get when FlexFuel is involved.

    With all those GM cars y'all should have a Tech2 in your tool box.
     
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  4. iamdub

    iamdub We need a new plague.

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    I was reminded of that whole mess just as I read the OP's post! I wonder whatever happened with that...

    I just looked up the XFE. It gets it's extra 1 MPG from 3.08 rear gear (bleh!), lowered suspension (looks minimal- maybe 1"?), standard alloy wheels, aluminum suspension parts (lower control arms, I'm sure) and an aluminum spare. This intrigues me because I swear I lost 1-2 average MPG since I lifted/leveled mine. So I should expect to gain that back and possibly more when I drop it ~3/4.

    Anyway, not to get off topic: I'm betting that the battery loses it's capacity over time as is inherent with rechargeable batteries. But, isn't so critical because the vehicle still has the gas engine to power it. It's just that, as the battery loses it's capacity, the vehicle simply runs on the electrical system less and less, effectively slowly transitioning it to more of a gas-only vehicle. So, a used hybrid (assuming the battery isn't so fresh) would get even less of the EPA estimated MPG right outta the gate.
     
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  5. TeaSpoon

    TeaSpoon TYF Newbie

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    I was looking for a hybrid Yukon a year ago and in my research I found a lot of guys who had oil consumption issues. If I remember correctly, the later model years addressed this issue from 2011-2013. 2008-2010 has the issues. I believe the same went for the AFM issues too. Somewhere in there they changed transmission gearing too, more gears, better mpg and also less problems. I know those are broad statements, but it gives you some more to research. I like to go through carcomplaints.com and look up the nhtsa reported issues and if there was a recall or fix attached to it, it’s a great site.
    I’ve had two hybrids so far (non gm) and they’ve been worth it. Besides better mpg, they’ve been quicker out of the gate with the electric motors assisting the gas engine I’ve and had less problems than the same models without hybrid engines (due to the Atkinson cycle they run on). I didn’t buy the hybrid Yukon only because I decided I wanted a suburban.
    Hope this helps!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  6. dszx13

    dszx13 Full Access Member

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    I had a 09 Sierra hybrid for 4 years. I sold it 2 months ago. Parts are getting harder and more expensive to find. I loved it though. Still hate myself for letting it go but my wallet will thank me

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  7. Firewater

    Firewater TYF Newbie

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    I bought a 08 4WD Yukon Hybrid in January of 2015 w/95k miles on it.

    Thought I got a pretty good deal - 3k under book from a dealer on truck that had obviously been well-cared for.

    I also liked having the 400HP at my disposal.

    Right around 100k, I had a lifter collapse that ended up blowing the engine. After the fact, I learned that this isn't uncommon around that mile range. Sweet.

    I ended up splitting the dealer cost of a new engine (cost to me: $3500), so it's been a wash.

    I'm not seeing that much savings in terms of gas/MPG due to the fact that most of my miles are city driving, but when I do get our on the expressway I like gaming it so my PPG is in the 50s. So I think your savings will depends on your driving patterns.

    Also: all that I've read before joining this forum indicates that battery issues show up around 160k
     
  8. Hybrid-Theory

    Hybrid-Theory TYF Newbie

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    I would not recommend a Hybrid over a clean regular Tahoe.

    A new authentic GM (not re manufactured) hybrid battery is $3700(part only), maybe around $3000 if you can get a good deal....however, they are currently not available, they have been on back order for several months with no definitive delivery date. There is an issue because Panasonic spun off their hybrid battery division and the newly formed company apparently has no interest in supplying GM parts for a discontinued model.

    The Hybrid battery lasts approx. 10 years or 150K miles, less if it is routinely exposed to extreme heat or cold.

    Mine currently needs a hybrid battery, 180K miles 10 years....I going to have to rebuild the one I have because new ones are not available and it won't pass emissions with the MIL light on.

    Thankfully, unlike a Prius, the Tahoe will continue to drive fine with a bad battery, mine has been weak for about a year now.

    I had to replace the transmission at 150K miles....$6k from the dealer with a 3 year 100K mile warranty.

    other than the battery and transmission I have just has normal BS tahoe repairs over the past 10 years...door locks, motor mounts, oil sender, ETC.

    so....with the 10K in extra "hybrid" repairs (transmission & Battery) I barely got my moneys worth out of it.

    I am the original owner so the savings on the MPG paid for the transmission & battery.

    a second owner would NOT get their moneys worth if either the transmission or battery need to be replaced, they would be devastated it both needed to be replaced.

    If i were going to buy a used Tahoe, I personally would go for a regular (non-hybrid) one. A regular tahoe that is maintained should go 300K miles without major repairs.(motor, transmission, etc)

    Oh and FYI...anyone that has AFM or lifter problems with this motor(or the 5.3, 6.2) , 1. Didn't change the oil frequently enough or 2. didn't change the screen under the oil sending unit, that $3 screen needs to be changed or at least inspected every 75-100K miles. That tiny screen gets clogged, starves the AFM system/upper valve train of lubrication....and well you know the rest. This motor is bulletproof providing you keep the oil clean at all times.(this is hard to verify for second owners)
     
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  9. dnt1010

    dnt1010 Member

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    Good info Hybrid-Theory. Only thing I would add would be that noone should consider a GM Two Mode Hybrid as a viable means of sole transportation. I think it is a good fit as a 3rd or as in my case a 4th vehicle for people that have mechanical skills /inclination to perform there own repairs and just want a beater to drive that is unique.
    The possibility of issues is multiplied many times over compared to a std truck due to having combined gas-electric drivetrain/being a discontinued product/low overall factory build volume/hard to find and costly repair parts/hard to find skilled repair shops/hard to find info on self repairs. For people in the right position and with careful shopping a nice well maintained unit can be bought for practically nothing as everyone is scared to death of the legacy costs of keeping one of these things running, just as they SHOULD be. How much do you want for your 2008 unit with the bad battery Hybrid Theory? I am thinking 12 to $1,500.00? I will keep it in storage for spare parts since the hybrid battery is already gone, this will work perfectly for me...........
    2009 Tahoe Hybrid.jpg
     

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