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1997 Tahoe 5.7 L V8 quick question, need help identifying heater hose connector

Discussion in 'Engine & Drivetrain' started by 1997TahoeFix, Mar 4, 2021.

  1. 1997TahoeFix

    1997TahoeFix Member

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    I wasn't sure which section to post this in because I'm not sure what this hose does. I have a leak which is producing a loud hissing noise, It appears to be coming from this connection:

    PXL_20210304_210240243.jpg

    PXL_20210304_211557412.jpg

    What exactly is this called? Or rather what is the best terminology to use when shopping for a replacement? Also if you have any additional tips about how to reinstall a replacement, any information helps.
     
  2. drakon543

    drakon543 Full Access Member

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    thats an easy one very common failure
    Screenshot_20210304-202814_Samsung Internet.jpg Screenshot_20210304-202826_Samsung Internet.jpg
    there ya go pictures and part number for dorman replacement. worked perfectly on my 97 i used to have
     
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  3. PNW VietVet

    PNW VietVet Supporting Member

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    IMO, I would get the new correct GM hose assembly and get a new GM connector if still available and when you replace them I would lube with a small amount of grease when push together. When you remove the threaded connector I would spray penetrant on the threads and let soak before trying to remove. I would do the penetrant spray 3-4 times over a couple of days if you can. I have seen the threads break off in the intake and then you have to take a small sharp chisel and come in and break the broken thread part in to smaller pieces and let them chip out of there. Then if you have to do that you take a pipe tap and clean up the threads and use a little grease on the threads as you tap down in there.

    In the first pic you can see the corrosion built up at that push in connection. There is the squeeze connector and an o-ring in there. The threads can't be any better.
     
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  4. 1997TahoeFix

    1997TahoeFix Member

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    Thanks so much guys.

    It looks like there are two dorman models, I actually need the 800-402
    Screenshot_20210305-063035.png

    Does it matter? Or are they interchangeable?
     
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  5. drakon543

    drakon543 Full Access Member

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    800 402 is for the larger fitting 800 401 is for the 5/8 hose connection. they are not interchangeable for what your doing. 800 401 should be the one you want. it looks somewhat different than the original but i needed one on the quick so i bought it in the store. they will give you the one thier system says fits and thats the 800 401 so i definitely used the 401.
     
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  6. 1997TahoeFix

    1997TahoeFix Member

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    GOD DAMNIT

    I saw what a nightmare other people had removing their heater hose quick connector from the intake manifold after snapping it off. So I took every possible precaution to avoid this. I cleaned the base thoroughly and covered it with WD-40, reapplying it two or three times a day all weekend, for two and a half days straight. I connected my 1 1/16" deep socket to an extension and then to a perfectly calibrated socket wrench. I made sure it was perfectly lined up, as far down as it could go while allowing a smooth turn. I was confident I had done everything possible as I slowly begin to apply rotational pressure.

    It instantly snapped off. The crappy pot metal was so weak and corroded that it actually broke by ripping off in the rotational direction you turn it. I literally twisted it off. Nothing could have been done to prevent this.

    Some people suggested using a hacksaw to make tiny cuts at the top and then using a pic or chisel to slowly pull the pieces out. This is not working or I am not understanding what they mean. Slowly chipping away at this thing doesn't seem to be an option because eventually I will reach the threads and destroy them. So here I am, a carved up hole with corroded crap stuck inside:

    PXL_20210308_230417118.jpg

    I suppose the next option is to find one of these extraction tools. Like most people, I have never had much luck with these types of products. I understand there is one specifically made for removing a heater hose quick connect coupling. You know GM did a terrible job of designing something when there is literally a tool required and sold by the thousands just to correct it.

    If anyone has advice, please let me know. I really don't want to remove the entire intake manifold and I really don't want to have to rethread. I know there was nothing I could do to avoid this but I'm still pretty upset. I spent the entire weekend hoping and preparing for what was inevitable failure. Now I'm screwed, can't drive the car, and have to order the tool or take an Uber to a local store to buy it.

    Rough day.
     
  7. exp500

    exp500 Full Access Member

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    The Hacksaw blade trick works good, 3 or more vertical cuts as far as you can go without hitting threads. Pull blade dont push. Then hit it with chisel to peel it away. Could take an hour.
    I use air Dremel to cut and usually rethread. Most are Loctited thats why they snap. If threads feel loose, Oversize it and tap to standard pipe thread, buy fitting at hardware store for 5/8 hose.
     
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  8. 1997TahoeFix

    1997TahoeFix Member

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    I've read several comments describing this technique And I still just don't understand what people are saying. How does it "peel away"? Where am I placing the chisel? Are people using a really small chisel? I wish there was a video or diagram.

    What I'm experiencing is that I'm able to make tiny chips in the metal of the stuck piece and remove little pieces at a time. But as I get closer and closer to the threading, nothing is... happening. I'm just getting closer and closer to the threads. I'm certain that I will eventually chisel into them and hurt the threads. I don't know how to word this... but there is no mechanism which stops me from chiseling past the stuck piece and into the threads.
     
  9. Fless

    Fless Full Access Member

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    Something like this guy does with the Dremel, but instead you can use a small hacksaw blade to cut through most of the stuck piece, being careful not to damage the casting's threads. Or if you can get an extractor of the right size, you could try that.

     
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  10. exp500

    exp500 Full Access Member

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    Correct, small chisel. about 1/4 inch or so wide. Or sharpen a screwdriver. Big deal is getting cuts deep enough so you break out 3 pieces of fitting. Cut inside of broken off fitting piece vertically at 120 degree spacing full length of part in manifold. I don't know how to make it more clear. Sometimes it doesn't work and you have to drill/tap. Angle chisel about 45 degrees and try to catch as much of fitting as you can, AWAY from threads.
     
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