Brake job

Discussion in 'Engine & Drivetrain' started by Kodiak Yukon, May 19, 2017.

  1. Kodiak Yukon

    Kodiak Yukon Member

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    alright. I am replacing the rear rotors and pads on my 07 Yukon.

    Question is. Is it required that I do a brake bleed?

    I know the car needs a brake fluid change but I am doing the brake job by myself don't have anyone to pump the brake pedal for me.

    Please send me your thoughts and ideas.
     
  2. kbuskill

    kbuskill Full Access Member

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    No.... as long as you dont take the brake line loose there is no need to bleed the brakes.

    Just use a big C clamp or something to push the pistons back into the calipers so your new pads will fit. And remember to pump the brake pedal a few times after its complete before you drive the truck.
     
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  3. iamdub

    iamdub Too cold, too cold

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    Technically, no, as Ken said.

    But, if it needs a fluid change, now's a good time since you start at the back anyway. I bleed brakes by myself. I pour about 2 inches of fresh fluid into a Smart Water bottle (the kind with the flip top lid) to let the hose be submerged and to weight the bottle down. I use some clear hose I bought from Lowe's or Home Depot and stick it into the bottle until the hose reaches the bottom and curves to the side. The hose is a good fit through the bottle's spout. I slip the other end over the bleeder screw, crack it loose, then go slowly push the pedal- no need to pump. I learned that you should NOT push the pedal all the way to the floor. Try to not go any further than you would if you were making an emergency stop. I pump it a few times then quickly go check the hose for air bubbles. I check the reservoir then pump some more. Of course, you start at the right rear. So, you can bleed this one until the fluid in the hose goes from dark (the old fluid) to light (new fluid) and you'd have most of the old stuff out of the system. Move to the left rear and do the same. If your clear hose is long enough, you can position the bottle so that you can see it while you pump. A few times while pumping, I'll turn the key to the "on" position (not crank) to cycle the solenoids in the ABS module. I do this right after I start to push on the pedal. This will push out any air trapped in the ABS valves. It may sound like a lot, but it's really not and I can bleed much faster this way than if I had help because I don't have to keep barking out "Pump!" "Hold!" "Are you pumping?!" "How's the pedal feel?!" "Are you holding?!" "Are you still there?!"
     
  4. HiHoeSilver

    HiHoeSilver Away! Supporting Member

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    Does cycling the key really purge the air from abs effectively? There's all kinds of talk about needing a Tech II, or going to a gravel road and slamming on the brakes.... Planning on doing calipers and lines all around soon, been unsure about proper bleeding.
     
  5. Kodiak Yukon

    Kodiak Yukon Member

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    Thanks kbuskill. I know the c clamp trick. Good to hear.

    And iamdub that's some good info and very true about the second person helping. It's always a wife or someone that has no idea what they are doing.

    Thanks for the help guys.
     
  6. kbuskill

    kbuskill Full Access Member

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    Or you can use a vacuum pump and an old jar.... works great.

    rps20170519_231224_838.jpg

    rps20170519_231338_928.jpg

    Crack open the bleeder and start the pump and make sure you are standing next to the reservoir because things move fast... lol

    I use this setup to bleed brakes... if I were doing a fluid swap I would get a bigger jar, like maybe a big gallon pickle jar. Yes I know I'm kinda redneck but I had the vacuum pump for doing A/C work and this setup makes it so easy.
     
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  7. Kodiak Yukon

    Kodiak Yukon Member

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    That's awesome.
     
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  8. iamdub

    iamdub Too cold, too cold

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    I've never had a problem doing it. It may not be as fast as using a Tech II to hold the valves open, but it works just fine for someone that doesn't have such equipment. I've done the slamming on brakes in gravel (or in a grassy field in my case), but then I have to park and get back under the car to bleed it again if not jack it up and pull the wheels. By that time, the air bubbles could work their way back to the module.

    If the fluid is under pressure (when you just start to apply pedal pressure), then the fluid and air bubbles should move the instant the valves open. Since the valves cycle during the self-test when the key is turned on, doing this trick a few times properly should be plenty effective enough.
     
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