2 Speed Transfer Case

Discussion in 'Lifted Supension - Z71 & 4x4' started by OilfieldTrash78, Oct 7, 2017.

  1. OilfieldTrash78

    OilfieldTrash78 Member

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    what are the benefits of a 2 speed transfer case?
     
  2. OilfieldTrash78

    OilfieldTrash78 Member

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    No one?
     
  3. Suburban13

    Suburban13 TYF Newbie

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    In my opinion . . . Low range is very nice to have when you need it. Pulling something heavy a short distance off road, pulling out a stuck vehicle/equipment with ease, etc.

    For just average driving on slick, icy, snow, or muddy conditions the single speed would probably be just fine. I just like the option of hooking to something in low and easily applying the accelerator and let the low gearing do the work.
     
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  4. swathdiver

    swathdiver Full Access Member

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    Tractive effort! The gearing for 4LO is 2.68:1. Top speed is 39 mph.

    It's nice to have but whether you need it or not depends on how you use your truck.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2017
  5. Fifty

    Fifty Full Access Member

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    High speed means you can drive with the added traction and still steer...
    Lo speed means stay slow... lots of added grunt traction but at an expense of swiftness.
     
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  6. bgsntth

    bgsntth Member

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    Need low range for ascending steep gravel/grass hills - not enough grunt to ascend at low speeds w/o LoRange. Literally cannot climb the hills on our ranch without low-range gearing. Nice for tiptoeing through the rocky creeks, as well.

    Ranch Lot 5.jpg
     
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  7. David Smith

    David Smith Full Access Member

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    I have to agree with everyone above. I have used my 4LO to pull people out of ditches and mud. If you have no intentions of ever going off road, up/down steep hill, or anything that may require extra torque, then there is no advantage of 4LO in my opinion. Even something as pulling a heavy boat up a boat ramp could require 4LO.
     
  8. Z71Jack

    Z71Jack Member

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    The main benefit to having a 2-speed transfer case is the Low-Range. This is something that you would use for difficult terrain, extreme hills, or towing. Keep in mind that low-range sends more torque to the wheels...it doesn't increase traction.

    You do NOT use low-range in the snow or ice...it will cause the wheels to slip because of the extra torque.
     
  9. OilfieldTrash78

    OilfieldTrash78 Member

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    Thanks guys!! That’s what I needed! I will continue looking for a nice used z71, so I can get that 2 speed TC!
     
  10. swathdiver

    swathdiver Full Access Member

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    From the 2009 Owner's Manual:

    2 m (Two-Wheel Drive High): This setting is used for
    driving in most street and highway situations. The front
    axle is not engaged in two-wheel drive. This setting also
    provides the best fuel economy.

    AUTO (Automatic Four-Wheel Drive): This setting is
    ideal for use when road surface traction conditions
    are variable. When driving your vehicle in AUTO, the
    front axle is engaged, but the vehicle’s power is primarily
    sent to the rear wheels. When the vehicle’s software
    determines a need for more traction, the system
    will transfer more power to the front wheels. Driving in
    this mode results in slightly lower fuel economy than
    Two-Wheel Drive High.

    4 m (Four-Wheel Drive High): Use the four-wheel high
    position when you need extra traction, such as on snowy
    or icy roads or in most off-road situations. This setting
    also engages your front axle to help drive the vehicle.
    This is the best setting to use when plowing snow.

    4 n (Four-Wheel Drive Low): This setting also engages
    the front axle and delivers extra torque. You may never
    need this setting. It sends maximum power to all four
    wheels. You might choose Four-Wheel Drive Low if you
    are driving off-road in deep sand, deep mud, deep snow,
    and while climbing or descending steep hills.
    The vehicle has StabiliTrak®. Shifting into
    Four-Wheel-Drive Low will turn Traction Control and
    StabiliTrak® off.
     
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